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How To Copy A Starfish: A Two-Part Mold

Posted on 13 Apr 12:32

Need a little splash of creativity?

Fishing for something new to do?

Why not take a memory from a past vacation and put your own creative spin on it? Seashells, sand dollars or starfish are wonderful objects that you can copy and design however you like using Mold Making Material.

Objects with a flat side or base can be molded in one sitting with the One-Part Mold Method. Objects like the starfish don’t have a flat portion anywhere so they require the Two-Part Mold Method that we'll explain here. It's the best way to capture the texture of the whole object.

Let's "sea" if you can do it.

 

First, measure and cut a cardboard box big enough to fit the starfish. Line the inside of the box with packing tape so that it's waterproof and will easily release the mold.

Grab some Plasticine and spread it out inside the box so that the whole floor is covered.

Place your starfish into the Plasticine so that it is halfway covered. The starfish is delicate so be careful not to damage it.

Now it's time to bring on the Mold Making Material. Carefully measure out equal amounts of Part A and Part B by volume, not weight. 

Combine the 2 parts and mix until the color is a consistent blue.

Pour the Mold Making Material mixture over the entire half of your object that is exposed in the Plasticine.

Now wait approximately 3 to 4 hours for the Mold Making Material to cure. Once that time has passed, cut and remove the Plasticine and mold from the box. Try not to damage the box as you will be using it again to pour the second half.

Remove all of the Plasticine, cleaning off any little bits that may be clinging to the object or mold.

Now it is time to make the second half of the mold. Flip over the mold and place it back into the cardboard frame. The starfish should be on top. 

In order to fill the completed mold we need a pouring spout (FUN FACT: technically this is called a sprue). Take a straw or a small amount of the Plasticine and place it at the tip of one of the legs, against the box.


This pouring spout will provide the opening for you to pour in the substance that you intend to use to make your duplicate objects.

Once again, measure, mix and pour the Mold Making Material over the rest of the starfish and wait another 3 to 4 hours for the mixture to cure.

Remove the mold from the box as you are now ready to remove the starfish from the mold.

After removing the Plasticine spout, carefully cut an opening big enough to remove the starfish. In this case, we cut from the hole, down the top leg of the starfish, and across to the next leg.  This cut was done symmetrically down both sides. 

From there, only two legs were left completely inside the mold, and we were able to pry the mold open and remove the object.

Cleaning out the starfish mold is important as the organic object had debris that came loose in the mold.

Your Two-Part Mold is complete and you can now make exact replicas of your object.

You can use many different substances to fill the mold such as polyurethane and wax but we recommend ArtResin in combination with our line of ResinTints.

Just like Mold Making Material, ArtResin is a simple 1 to 1 ratio of resin and hardener. Measure out equal parts of both solutions and mix thoroughly for 3 minutes. You’ll have approximately 45 minutes of working time with the resin mixture before it will begin to set.

Grab any color of ResinTint and pour a few drops into the ArtResin. Then just mix 'er up.

Because you had to cut the mold open, you now need to tape the mold closed using Tuck Tape or packing tape.

Make sure it is securely sealed and slowly pour ArtResin into the mold through the pouring hole. If the hole is small, you may want to use an eye dropper.

ArtResin is hard to the touch after 24 hours but a full, hardened cure will take 72. Once your starfish has cured, remove it from the mold and admire your handiwork!

From there, have fun and create as many replicas as your heart desires.

...Do you copy? ;)

 

 

 

 


Jessica Mullis is our Instagram Winner!

Posted on 1 Apr 16:07

Congratulations to artist Jessica Mullis, our latest Instagram winner! Jessica is a self-taught artist based in Dayton, Ohio. Though she works full time in graphic design, Jessica never considered herself an artist - until she was gifted a watercolor set that sent her on a whole new creative path.

 


Her first paintings were of the moon and made her fall in love with watercolors.  Soon after, Jessica discovered ArtResin and the beautiful, mystical dimension it added to her work. So inspired, she began to experiment with resin's magic and endless creative possibilities.

Jessica has always longed to add joy and beauty to the world.  She hopes the viewer can feel the magic and wonder in us all when they interact with her work.


 

 

You can find more of Jessica’s work on Instagram @moondrop.collective or on her website: www.moondropcollective.com

 



Congratulations on your win, Jessica!

To celebrate all the amazing artists staying home and creating, every month we will be sending out a 32 oz kit to a couple of artists who have tagged us on Instagram—and we'll share their work with the world! 

Don't forget, tag YOUR ArtResin work with @art_resin on Instagram, and YOU could be our next winner!!


ArtResin:  Made For Artists, By Artists.



 


Bee O'Donovan is our Instagram Winner!

Posted on 24 Mar 10:17

Congratulations to artist Bee O'Donovan, our latest Instagram winner! Bee is a full-time graphic designer and part-time artist. She has always been drawn to abstract art and mixed-media as it is a great way to create something beautiful and unique.

Every single one of Bee's art pieces is mesmerizing, vibrant and one of a kind. She not only creates canvas abstracts but stylized clocks as well.


 


Bee is happy to do commissioned pieces and will work with the client to determine the color palette they're looking for. Then she mixes and pours, switching between dirty pours or flip cups. It's all topped off with a shiny coat of ArtResin.

Bee never thought that having a business like this (that she loves) would be possible. She truly hopes that others enjoy watching her journey as she gets such a buzz out of creating her artwork - pun fully intended ;)

 

 


You can find more of Bee’s work on Instagram @made_by_bee_x or on her website: www.artmadebybee.com.

 

 

Congratulations on your win, Bee!

 

To celebrate all the amazing artists staying home and creating, every month we will be sending out a 32 oz kit to a couple of artists who have tagged us on Instagram—and we'll share their work with the world! 

 

Don't forget, tag YOUR ArtResin work with @art_resin on Instagram, and YOU could be our next weekly winner!!

 


How to Make a Cast of a Camera: Making a One-Part Mold Using Mold Making Material

Posted on 17 Mar 12:27

Everyone loves to look at photos. From cool selfies to family memories, pictures say more than a thousand words.


But what about the camera? Cameras have changed so much over the past few decades, sporting all sorts of different looks and styles. Wouldn't it be cool to cast your own camera, adding your own special flare to it?

Copy that.

Here's a quick snapshot on how to make a one-part mold of a camera using our new product, Mold Making Material.

The first thing we did was make a box slightly larger than the camera. We like to leave about ½” to ¾” of space between the box and the object you're cloning.

We used foam core for this mold’s frame, taping the sides together and also lining the inside of the box with clear packing tape.

The tape helps the box to become waterproof and also allows for the finished mold to be easily pulled away.

We then superglued the camera to the bottom of the box so that nothing moved once the liquid silicone was added.

Next it was time for the Mold Making Material. We mixed equal measurements of Part A and Part B until the color was consistent.

The 2 parts of the Mold Making Material kit are actually 2 different colors (white and dark blue) so you'll know when the mixture is thoroughly mixed when the color becomes one consistent medium blue hue.

Next, we poured the mixture into our container and over our camera.

Then, we waited for the mold to cure. 3-4 hours at room temperature will do the trick.

After poking the mold to ensure it was ready (solid and not sticky), we removed the camera from the mold.

Ba-da-boom! The mold is complete. We can now make exact replicas of this camera over and over and over again.

You can use many different substances to fill the mold such as polyurethane and wax but we recommend ArtResin in combination with our line of ResinTints.

Just like Mold Making Material, ArtResin is a simple 1 to 1 ratio of resin and hardener. Measure out equal parts of both solutions and mix thoroughly for 3 minutes. You’ll have approximately 45 minutes of working time with the resin mixture before it will begin to set.

Grab any color of ResinTint and pour a few drops into the ArtResin. Then just mix it all together.

Pour your tinted resin into the mold right to the top and let it sit for at least 24 hours. ArtResin is hard to the touch after 24 hours but a full, hardened cure will take 72.

Once time has passed, feel free to remove the new camera from the mold. You can repeat this process many times over as the mold is strong enough to make multiple copies.

Can't you just picture the endless possibilities?

Have fun and create as many replicas as you wish.

...Do you copy? ;)

 


Kyla Gray is our Instagram Winner!

Posted on 8 Mar 11:07

Congratulations to artist Kyla Gray, our latest Instagram winner! Kyla is a self-taught resin artist and full-time paramedic in Winnipeg, Manitoba. She just discovered ArtResin a year ago and loves to create custom hair clips for her daughters and her fans on Instagram.

ArtResin provides the versatility she's looking for in order to be creative with different colors and materials. It also enables her to provide quality pieces that last.


 

Kyla will dream up her unique designs or custom colors and then place them in her molds. After ensuring that there are no air bubbles, she demolds her designs the next morning and adheres them to the alligator clips once the ArtResin has fully cured.


 

 

You can find more of Kyla’s work on Instagram @rowanroseresin.

 
Congratulations on your win, Kyla!

 

To celebrate all the amazing artists staying home and creating, every month we will be sending out a 32 oz kit to a couple of artists who have tagged us on Instagram—and we'll share their work with the world! 

 

Don't forget, tag YOUR ArtResin work with @art_resin on Instagram, and YOU could be our next weekly winner!!

 


Dueling Paintbrushes

Posted on 26 Feb 16:31


Episode 3 - A Picture Is Worth 2 Words


Welcome to Dueling Paintbrushes!

This series pits 2 creative artists against each other with limited time and limited resources.

Dave and Rebecca are both skilled artists who—what, with co-running a business, and a home, and co-parenting—rarely get a chance to dabble with artistic pursuits these days. So we decided to have a little fun.

 


In Episode 3, we changed things up yet again. This round we left the door open for Dave and Rebecca to use any art supplies in the room.

The catch?

The inspiration for their art piece will be 2 random words that they must select from a pile in front of them.

And as always, they had to do it in 30 minutes.


Again it was highly entertaining to watch these two artists race against the clock to try and "out-duel" each other. It was another successful experiment that we hope you, at home, will take part in.

Once you watch the video, please vote or comment on our YouTube channel as to who you think won the competition. Was it Rebecca and her "Drink Special" or Dave and his "Eye Test." *Voting for this episode has closed.

Also, please let us know if you'd like to see more of these competitions. Once things settle down in the world around us, we hope to open our doors and invite other artists to join in on the competition where everyone's a winner :)

Enjoy!

 

Episode 2 - No Paintbrush. No Problem.


In Episode 2, we switched things up. This round we provided a bin filled with materials that they had to use to create their artwork. No other art supplies could be used.

 


They had no paintbrush.

No art direction.

And they had to do it in 30 minutes.


Voting has finished for this episode but the response has been great! Thank you to everyone watching this series. Hopefully you have fun watching or playing along as we have so much fun creating it :)

 

Episode 1 - The Pilot Episode

The premiere episode. The one that started it all.

We came up with this series for a few reasons:

1) We wanted to entertain you
2) We wanted to inspire you
3) We wanted to showcase the beauty of interpretation
4) We wanted to watch mommy and daddy compete! These two are highly, HIGHLY competitive people.

 


To start this series off, we chose an image, separated the two of them and asked them to create their own masterpiece based off of that image. In 30 minutes.

What followed was a plethora of action, sass, creativity, stress, inspiration, you name it! It was truly a fun experiment that we hope you, at home, will enjoy.

Stay tuned for more as we continue to challenge Dave and Rebecca and perhaps a few surprise guests.

Til then...

 


How To Copy Chess Pieces

Posted on 22 Feb 11:25

Let's play a game.

A game where all of the pieces are designed by you!

Kind of a fun idea right? Well let's get to it.

 

Gather your objects like we did with our chess pieces. You could build a box for each piece but we think it's more efficient to build a box big enough to hold all of your pieces in one mold.

One box, one pour, one mold.

We spaced out the six different figures with approximately ½” between them, and measured the length and width of the box we needed, leaving about ¾” extra space on each side.

We used foam core for this mold’s frame, taping the sides together and also lining the inside of the box with clear packing tape. The tape helps the box to become waterproof and also allows for the finished mold to be easily pulled away.

Next, we super glued each chess piece to the bottom of the box so that they wouldn't move within the Mold Making Material.

Then it was time for the Mold Making Material. We mixed equal measurements of Part A and Part B until the color was consistent.

The 2 parts of the Mold Making Material kit are actually 2 different colors (white and dark blue) so you'll know when the mixture is thoroughly mixed when the color becomes one consistent medium blue hue.

Next, we poured the mixture into our container and over our chess pieces.

Then, we waited for the mold to cure. 3-4 hours at room temperature will do the trick.

After poking the mold to ensure it was ready, we took apart our box and pulled each chess piece out of the mold.

Ta-daaaa! Our mold is complete and we can now make exact replicas of our chess pieces.

You can use many different substances to fill the mold such as polyurethane and wax but we recommend ArtResin in combination with our line of ResinTints.

Just like Mold Making Material, ArtResin is a simple 1 to 1 ratio of resin and hardener. Measure out equal parts of both solutions and mix thoroughly for 3 minutes. You’ll have approximately 45 minutes of working time with the resin mixture before it will begin to set.

Grab any color of ResinTint and pour a few drops into the ArtResin. Then just mix 'er up. In this case we’ve selected black and metallic white to create our army of chess pieces.

Pour your tinted resin into the mold right to the top and let it sit for at least 24 hours. ArtResin is hard to the touch after 24 hours but a full, hardened cure will take 72.

Remove the pieces one at a time and voila! Your very own set of chess pieces to wow your opponents with.

Check... mate.

From there, have fun and create as many replicas as your heart desires.

...Do you copy? ;)

 


Josie Boyer is our Instagram Winner!

Posted on 22 Feb 11:24

Congratulations to artist Josie Boyer, our latest Instagram winner! Josie is a full-time artist, student and single mom. She declared herself an artist at the young age of 4 and loves to help other artists find their voice.

Josie's preferred mediums are acrylic and ceramics. She loves the versatility of acrylics and the hands-on feeling of ceramics. Her works are often 3D, durable and something that the viewer can touch or hold in their hand.



 
Josie's process varies with each piece. It's all about being prepared so as not to interrupt the flow. She creates a path for the eyes to follow and pays particular attention to how she responds emotionally to the colors she uses. In many cases she will apply a clear coat of ArtResin to protect and add life to her pieces.

Being creative is very personal and sacred to Josie. Her artwork speaks to her, tells a story and says something important. She hopes that the viewer connects with her work perhaps through a simple, forgotten memory. A feeling of peace that Josie found while making it.

Creating is limitless, and with that, comes total freedom.

 

 

 

You can find more of Josie’s work on Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/JosieBoyerArt

 

 

Congratulations on your win, Josie!

 

To celebrate all the amazing artists staying home and creating, every month we will be sending out a 32 oz kit to a couple of artists who have tagged us on Instagram—and we'll share their work with the world! 

 

Don't forget, tag YOUR ArtResin work with @art_resin on Instagram, and YOU could be our next weekly winner!!


Mold Making Material: One-Part vs. Two-Part Molds

Posted on 9 Feb 15:35


There is an endless number of things you can duplicate with Mold Making Material and 2 methods that work best depending on the object you're copying.

In this blog, we will examine the One-Part Method vs. the Two-Part Method.


ONE-PART MOLD METHOD

The one-part mold is the simplest method, but only works for certain shapes or objects.  This is also the quickest method because the mixture is poured all at once around an object in one sitting.

The objects that are ideal for this method are ones with a flat side or base. This flat portion of your object allows you to place or glue the object to the floor of your surrounding box and pour the Mold Making Material all at once.

Our King Tut figurine featured here was an object ideal for a one-part mold because it was a simple shape with a flat bottom.  When the silicone cures, the mold can be taken out of the box, and the object can be pulled out of the mold.

Here's how it works:

First, you will need to find a box slightly larger than your object. We like to keep it easy and use pre-made boxes such as milk cartons, plastic containers and yogurt cups. 

You can also make your own frame to surround your object from cardboard, wood or foam core. Remember, the more space around the object, the thicker—and therefore stronger—your mold will be.

If you are making your own frame out of cardboard or foam core, it is important to seal the inside with tape so the box becomes waterproof. We use packing tape to seal our boxes and to cover the surface of the box so the mold will easily pull away from it later.

In the example shown, we are using a milk carton to house the King Tut figurine.  We cut the milk carton about an inch taller than King Tut and used the bottom half. Depending on the weight of your object, you could choose to glue it to the bottom of the box.

Now it’s time for the Mold Making Material. You’ll want to mix equal measurements of Part A and Part B until the color is consistent.

The 2 parts of the Mold Making Material kit are actually 2 different colors (white and dark blue) so you'll know when the mixture is thoroughly mixed when the color becomes one consistent medium blue hue.

Next, pour the mixture into your container and over your object.

Then, sit back and let the mold cure; 3-4 hours at room temperature will do the trick.

Once time has passed, you can poke the top of the silicone to make sure that it is not sticky anymore before removing it from the box.

 

Cut the box open and pull the whole mold out before removing the object.

 

Remove your object from the mold by carefully wiggling it out.

Congratulations, your mold is complete and you are now ready to make exact replicas of your object.

You can use many different substances to fill the mold such as polyurethane and wax but we recommend ArtResin in combination with our line of ResinTints.

ArtResin is another simple to use product that works comfortably well with Mold Making Material.

Follow this link the learn more about ArtResin and its world of creativity!!

 

 

TWO-PART MOLD METHOD

For a more complicated object, or an object that cannot be easily glued down in your box, a Two-Part Mold may be beneficial. 

A Two-Part Mold is made through two separate pours, using plasticine in the bottom half of your mold to hold the object in place.  An example of an object that would be better suited for a Two-Part Mold is a baseball. A baseball has no flat sides and won't stay sitting in one spot without help.


Here's how it works:

In the following example, we will create a Two-Part Mold for a starfish, another object without a flat side.

First we measure and cut a cardboard box big enough to fit the starfish.

We then place and spread plasticine into the bottom of the box so that the whole floor is covered.

Next, grab your object (starfish) and press it into the plasticine so it is halfway covered.  Be careful if your object is delicate.

Now it’s time for the Mold Making Material. You’ll want to mix equal measurements of Part A and Part B until the color is consistent.

The first pour of Mold Making Material should cover the half of your object protruding from the plasticine. 

Once the silicone has cured (approximately 3-4 hours after mixing), cut and remove the plasticine and mold from the box. Try not to damage the box as you will be using it again to pour the second part.

Remove all of the plasticine, cleaning off any little bits that may be clinging to the object or mold. 

Now place the mold back into the box with the cured Mold Making Material on the bottom. Now is the time to add a straw or something similar to your object in order to create a pouring spout. In this case, we simply reused a little bit of the plasticine in order to create the spout.

In a separate project, we super-glued a straw upright on the top of a baseball to act as our pouring spout. 

*Side note - a pouring spout is a void in the cured Mold Making Material. This void, or hole, allows you to pour in the substance you intend to use to make your duplicate objects. In our examples, we use tinted ArtResin.

The second pour of Mold Making Material can now be measured, mixed and poured over the rest of the object. 

Simply wait 3 hours and the mold will have cured. It can now be removed from the box and your object can be removed from the mold.

Cutting a mold to remove an object should be done in as few cuts as possible.  We typically cut from the pouring spout and down the middle of our mold, but it does depend on the shape of the object.  Cut the mold in small increments until you are able to pry the mold open to remove the object.

You can also remove the small piece of plasticine or straw as it is no longer necessary. You should now have a small hole to use to fill your silicone mold.

Your Two-Part Mold is complete and you can now make exact replicas of your object.

You can use many different substances to fill the mold such as polyurethane and wax but we recommend ArtResin in combination with our line of ResinTints.

One thing to remember when using a Two-Part Mold is to carefully, and as precisely as possible, tape the mold closed before filling it. This will ensure a proper duplicate with little to no lines from the separation in the mold.

If you do get lines or extra bits on you copied object, simply use an X-acto knife or Dremel to trim them off.

From there, have fun and create as many replicas as your heart desires.

...Do you copy? ;)


How To Use Mold Making Material

Posted on 3 Feb 13:56

Do you copy?

That's what we're asking everyone who's ever imagined taking something as simple as a piece of fruit and making their own colorful copy.

Sometimes you may want to take a little piece of pop culture and put your own creative spin on it.

Whatever the case, you need something to make a mold of that object so that you can get duplicating again and again.

Introducing Mold Making Material.

 

 

Mold Making Material is a 2-part silicone product that you can use to make your own reusable molds. Every mold is both flexible and strong making it easy to use over and over and over again. Mold Making Material is smooth and durable which allows the finished molds to stretch and bend without tearing.

Mold Making Material is non-toxic, odorless and safe for home use. There are no VOCs, no BPAs, and no fumes.

Here's how it works:

First, you will need to find a box slightly larger than your object. We like to use pre-made boxes such as milk cartons, plastic containers and yogurt cups. Finding useful boxes around the house is just another example of how accessible Mold Making Material is to anyone.

You can also make your own frame to surround your object from cardboard, wood or foam core. Remember, the more space around the object, the thicker, and therefore stronger, your mold will be.

If you are making your own frame out of cardboard or foam core, it is important to seal the inside with tape so the box becomes waterproof. We use packing tape to seal our boxes, and to cover the surface of the box so the mold will easily pull away from it later.

In the example shown, we are using a milk carton to house the King Tut figurine.  We cut the milk carton about an inch taller than King Tut and used the bottom half. Depending on the weight of your object, you could choose to glue it to the bottom of the box.

Now it’s time for the Mold Making Material. You’ll want to mix equal measurements of Part A and Part B until the color is consistent.

The 2 parts of the Mold Making Material kit are actually 2 different colors (white and dark blue) so you'll know when the mixture is thoroughly mixed when the color becomes one consistent medium blue hue.

Next, pour the mixture into your container and over your object.

Then, sit back and let the mold cure; 3-4 hours at room temperature will do the trick.

Once time has passed, you can poke the top of the silicone to make sure that it is not sticky anymore before removing it from the box.

 

Cut the box open and pull the whole mold out before removing the object.

 

Remove your object from the mold by carefully wiggling it out.

Congratulations, your mold is complete and you are now ready to make exact replicas of your object.

You can use many different substances to fill the mold such as polyurethane and wax but we recommend ArtResin in combination with our line of ResinTints.

 

ArtResin is another simple to use product that works comfortably well with Mold Making Material.

Follow this link the learn more about ArtResin and its world of creativity!!

So there you have it. The possibilities are truly endless.

Who knew cloning could be such fun?!

Well we did. And that’s why there’s Mold Making Material. So go ahead. Make a copy. And then make another, and another, and another, and another…

 

*Currently Mold Making Material is available in the USA and Canada.