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Why Does My Cured Resin Look Yellow?

Posted on 23 Sep 12:11

From time to time, you may find that your cured resined piece has unexpectedly changed in appearance from clear to yellow. Why does yellowing happen in cured resin and, more importantly, what can be done to help prevent it? There are several different reasons why epoxy resin can appear discolored: 

  • exposure to UV light
  • exposure to high temperatures
  • over torching
  • using a sealant that yellows
  • not allowing paint adequate time to dry
  • using titanium white paint
  • layering (which can cause a bulking effect.)

The most important step in preventing a resined piece from yellowing is to understand why it happens. Let's take a closer look at the most common conditions that cause cured epoxy resin to appear yellow. 


1. Exposure To UV Light

UV light damages epoxy resin

UV light exposure is the most common cause of yellowing, with sunlight being the biggest culprit.
UV light is powerful and, when it hits resin, can break down the polymers causing gloss loss, delamination, cracking, surface chalking and yellowing. The more UV light the cured epoxy resin is exposed to, the worse the damage will be.

ArtResin is chemically engineered with 2 light stabilizers to protect against UV light's damaging effects: a UV Light Stabilizer and an advanced additive called HALS (or Hindered Amine Light Stabilizer.)  The UV Stabilizer delays the effects from UV light, while the Hindered Amine Light Stabilizer discourages discoloration by interrupting the degradation process at the onset. Together, the UV Stabilizer and HALS in ArtResin are a powerful force to help mitigate the effects of UV exposure.

Best practice is to avoid exposing artwork to direct sunlight altogether. After all, putting your artwork in an environment that may cause damage doesn't make sense and makes the job much more difficult for ArtResin's UV stabilizers.

2. Exposure To High Temperatures

storing artwork in a hot environment causes resin to yellow

Continuous exposure to high temperatures or continually placing artwork too close to a heat source can also cause discoloration in epoxy resin. Some examples of this include:

  • storing your artwork in a space that isn't climate controlled, such as outdoors or in an attic
  • hanging your piece above a heat vent
  • hanging your piece in a sunny window
  • hanging your piece under a light source that generates heat such as gallery lights. The heat generated by the bulbs can eventually cause the resin to discolor in the spots where the light hits the resin.

Best practice is to keep cured resin art away from sources of heat and out of direct sunlight for extended periods of time. 

3. Over Torching

over torching causes resin to yellow

Over torching happens when a flame torch or heat gun is held too closely to a freshly resined surface. Over torching can cause resin to cure with a rippled effect and, in time, can lead to yellowing or discoloration. If your resined piece has only yellowed in certain spots and not throughout, those areas may have been over torched. 

Best practice is to hold the torch a few inches away from the surface so that the flame is just kissing the resin. The bubbles should disappear right away - if they don't, move in a bit closer. Keep the torch moving in a back and forth fashion across the entire surface, as if you're ironing clothes. Remember, when it comes to torching, less is more! 

4. Using A Sealant That Yellows

spraying sealant over artwork

Sometimes it's not the resin that has yellowed but the sealant, resulting in a discolored appearance overall. In most cases, you don't need to use a sealant before applying ArtResin, however it's a good idea over paper that may absorb resin, over loose materials, and over natural objects (such as wood) that may release trapped air and cause bubbles. We recommend doing a test on a scrap piece before resining to determine whether you need to seal first.

Best practice when it comes to sealing includes:

  • choosing a sealant that dries clear
  • using a spray sealant on fragile artwork that could be damaged by brushing on sealant
  • choosing a sealant that's appropriate for your artwork: a sealant designed for an acrylic painting might not be suitable for a photograph.
  • using a sealant that specifies "non-yellowing" on the label. We've had good results from the following non-yellowing sealants: Krylon Crystal Clear spray, Krylon Matte spray and Krylon UV Resistant spray. 

5. Not Letting Paint Adequately Dry

allow acrylic paint to thoroughly dry

Discoloration can occur if resin is applied to paint that isn't completely dry. Even if paint seems dry to the touch, this could simply be the initial skin that has formed over the surface. The paint in the center may still be evaporating and if it comes into contact with resin before it is sufficiently dried, the result could be a cloudy cure or eventual discoloration/yellowing.

Best practice is to allow the paint to completely dry before resining. If the paint gives under pressure, feels tacky, soft, or cool to the touch, this can be an indication that the paint has not dried all the way through. Dry time can be longer than one might think: depending on the temperature, humidity, and how thick the paint has been applied, it can take weeks (and even years in the case of oil paint) to completely dry.  

6. Using Titanium White 

titanium white paint turning resin yellow

Yellowing can occur as a result of an interaction between Titanium Dioxide, found in titanium white paint, and ANY brand of epoxy resin. Ti0
2 acts as a catalyst in most situations and can accelerate natural degradation when in direct contact with the resin.

Best practice when using titanium white paint under resin is to apply an appropriate sealant to act as a barrier between the 
Ti02 and the resin.

7. Bulking in Layered Resin

layers of resin look yellow

Although ArtResin was designed as a surface coating and meant to be poured in thin applications, many artists like to get a thicker coat by pouring multiple layers. Be aware, however, that if resin starts to discolor, a thick layer can amplify even a gentle yellowing. Just as the ocean looks blue but a cup of water looks clear, the yellowing you see in a thick layer of resin can look worse than it is because you're seeing it in bulk. 

Your Resin Has Yellowed ... Now What?


Unfortunately, once resin has yellowed, there isn't much that can be done to reverse it.
 
You can try sanding out the yellowed resin (being careful not to damage your artwork) and applying a fresh coat: you may not be able to salvage a piece with badly yellowed areas, but you might be able to lessen the discoloration. Your best bet, however, is to limit UV light and heat exposure in order to slow down further yellowing. 


Since most things on earth change in appearance as they age, no manufacturer of epoxy resin can guarantee that their product will never yellow. Our goal for ArtResin has always been to offer the best protection on the market against yellowing. We are confident in our product's performance because of the high quality ingredients and the chemistry behind our formula. Still, taking a few precautions will avoid compromising the yellowing protection inherent in ArtResin, and will help prolong the clarity of your work for the longterm.

 

ArtResin:  Made By Artists, For Artists.

 


How To Make A Resin Crystal

Posted on 22 Sep 08:46

Inspired by rock formations found in nature, geode resin art is popular for good reason. Using tinted resin, glitter, crushed glass and real crystals, the possibilities are endless and the results are beautiful.

You can buy crystals and gemstones to create geode art but they're expensive and since each one is unique, you might not always find exactly what you want. Now, thanks to Mold Making Material, when you find a crystal you love, you can duplicate it (and even customize the color) as many times as you wish.

We’re going to show you 2 ways to make your own crystals for geode art:

  1. how to copy a quartz cluster.
  2. how to copy several small gemstones or pieces of glass.

Let's get started.



Quartz Crystal Cluster

quartz crystal cluster made of resin


What You'll Need:

  • A quartz crystal cluster
  • A plastic container slightly bigger than the crystal
  • Mold Making Material
  • Hot glue gun (optional)
  • ArtResin epoxy resin 
  • Disposable gloves
  • Stir Sticks
  • Mixing cup with easy to read measurement lines 
  • ResinTint (optional)

supplies you need to make your own resin crystal


1. Prepare The Mold Making Material:

Measure out equal amounts of Mold Making Material and stir it up. Conveniently, Mold Making Material comes in a Part A and Part B that are 2 different colors: white and dark blue. You'll know when the mixture is ready once the color becomes a consistent medium blue hue. 


Mold Makin Material diy silicone molds

pour part A of mold making material
pour part B of mold making material
mix mold making material together until one consistent hue

Mold Making Material is a 2 part silicone product that makes durable, flexible molds that stretch without tearing and can be used over and over again. It's non-toxic, odorless and safe for home use. There are no VOCs, no BPAs, and no fumes.


2. Prepare Crystal & Container

Find a plastic container just slightly bigger than the crystal. The box should provide a snug fit while still leaving about 1/2" of space on each side to create a strong, durable mold that can be used again and again. You can use plastic or plastic lined items such as reusable food containers, yogurt cups or milk containers cut to size. Place the crystal into the container. 
💡TIP: Depending on the weight of your crystal, you may or may not need to glue it down to the bottom of your plastic container.

quartz crystal points cluster for geode resin art

place crystal into container to make silcone mold


3. Pour Into The Container:

Pour the Mold Making Material into one corner and let it flow over the crystal. Let it sit for 3-4 hours at room temperature. You’ll know it’s ready when it’s no longer tacky to the touch.

pour Mold Making Material into a container

To remove the mold, gently pry it from the container until it releases.


remove silicone mold from container


Once the mold is released, the crystal needs to be removed.  Using a utility knife, carefully cut the mold across the top of the crystal and pry it out.  

cut silicone mold to remove crystal
remove crystal from silicone mold

When you look inside, you can see that all of the details of your crystal have been captured perfectly. Congratulations - your mold is complete and you're ready to make replicas!

look inside the silicone mold to see the detail


Making A Replica


You can use many different substances to fill the mold, but we recommend ArtResin epoxy resin. Whether you tint it or use it straight out of the bottle, ArtResin gives your crystal replica a glass like finish that’s as shiny as the real thing.

artresin and resintint to make resin molds


Just like Mold Making Material, ArtResin is a simple 1:1 ratio of resin and hardener. Measure out equal parts of both solutions and mix thoroughly for 3 minutes. You’ll have approximately 45 minutes of working time with the resin mixture before it will begin to set.

pouring resin into measuring cup

pouring hardener into measuring cup
mixing epoxy resin for 3 minutes

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One of the great benefits of making your own crystals is that you can customize them to suit your own colour palette using ResinTint, our line of premium liquid colorants.  Add a few drops of ResinTint into the ArtResin and mix together until you have one consistent hue. ResinTint is a highly saturated colorant so always start with less than you think you'll need - you can always add more if necessary. 
💡TIP:  No matter which colorant you use, don't exceed 6% of the total combined volume of resin and hardener, otherwise your resin may not cure properly.  For example, if you have 50 ml resin + 50 ml hardener for a total of 100 ml, don't exceed 6 ml of colorant.

tint your resin and pour into a silicone mold
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Pour your clear or tinted resin into the mold and let it sit for at least 24 hours. ArtResin is hard to the touch after 24 hours, but a full, hardened cure will take 72.

pour resin into silicone mold

Once 24 hours has passed, the resin will be hard to the touch and the crystal casting can be removed from the mold.
 You can repeat this process many times over - the mold is strong enough to make multiple copies.

remove resin crystal from silicone mold

final resin crystal

We were so happy with the incredible detail we were able to capture with our molds that we decided to create a piece of geode art of our own. 

geode resin art

Crushed Glass

making diy resin crushed glass pieces for geode art


What You'll Need:

  • Crushed glass pieces or gemstones
  • A shallow plastic container 
  • Mold Making Material
  • Hot glue gun
  • ArtResin epoxy resin 
  • Disposable gloves
  • Stir Sticks
  • Mixing cup with easy to read measurement lines 
  • ResinTint (optional)


1. Prepare Glass Pieces & The Container

Find a shallow plastic container to fit several glass pieces. The container should be big enough to fit your pieces while still leaving about 1/2" of space on each side to create a strong, durable mold that can be used again and again. You can use plastic or plastic lined items such as reusable food containers, yogurt cups or milk containers cut to size.

Glue down the glass pieces with a hot glue gun: because they are lightweight, they will shift under the weight of the Mold Making Material. 

fireglass pieces for geode resin art
hot glue your glass pieces to container before pouring silicone mold making material

hot glue gun down glass pieces to bottom of container

2. Prepare The Mold Making Material:

Measure out equal amounts of Mold Making Material and stir it up. Conveniently, Mold Making Material comes in a Part A and Part B that are 2 different colors: white and dark blue. You'll know when the mixture is ready once the color becomes a consistent medium blue hue. 

making diy silicone molds
making silicone molds with mold making material

mixing up mold making material

Mold Making Material is a 2 part silicone product that makes durable, flexible molds that stretch without tearing and can be used over and over again. It's non-toxic, odorless and safe for home use. There are no VOCs, no BPAs, and no fumes.

3. Pour Into The Container:

Pour the Mold Making Material into one corner and let it flow over the crushed glass pieces. Let it sit for 3-4 hours at room temperature. You’ll know it’s ready when it’s no longer tacky to the touch.

pouring silicone mold making material to make diy resin glass for geode art

pouring mold making material to make resin fireglass for geode art

To remove the mold, gently pry it from the container until it releases.


remove silicone mold from container

Once the mold is released, the glass pieces need to be removed. Because the individual glass pieces have flat bottoms, they simply pop right out of the mold. Congratulations - your mold is complete and you're ready to make replicas! 

silicone mold ready for resin pour

Making A Replica


You can use many different substances to fill the mold, but we recommend ArtResin epoxy resin. Whether you tint it or use it straight out of the bottle, ArtResin gives your crystal replica a glass like finish that’s as shiny as the real thing.

artresin and resintint to make resin molds


Just like Mold Making Material, ArtResin is a simple 1:1 ratio of resin and hardener. Measure out equal parts of both solutions and mix thoroughly for 3 minutes. You’ll have approximately 45 minutes of working time with the resin mixture before it will begin to set.

 mixed artresin

Pour your tinted resin into the mold and let it sit for at least 24 hours. ArtResin is hard to the touch after 24 hours, but a full, hardened cure will take 72.

pouring epoxy resin into silicone mold

Once 24 hours has passed, the resin will be hard to the touch and the crystal casting can be removed from the mold. You can repeat this process many times over - the mold is strong enough to make multiple copies.

removing cured resin pieces from mold

cured resin pieced removed from silicone mold


One of the great benefits of making your own crystals is that you can customize them to suit your own colour palette using ResinTint, our line of premium liquid colorants.  Add a few drops of ResinTint into the ArtResin and mix together until you have one consistent hue. ResinTint is a highly saturated colorant so always start with less than you think you'll need - you can always add more if necessary. 
💡TIP:  No matter which colorant you use, don't exceed 6% of the total combined volume of resin and hardener, otherwise your resin may not cure properly.  For example, if you have 50 ml resin + 50 ml hardener for a total of 100 ml, don't exceed 6 ml of colorant.

epoxy resin tinted gold

pouring tinted resin into silicone mold

cured gold resin fireglass replicas


We were so happy with the incredible detail we were able to capture with our molds that we decided to create a piece of geode art of our own. 

resin geode art

resin geode art

Who knew cloning could be such fun?!

Well, we did. And that’s why there’s Mold Making Material.

So go ahead. Make a copy.
And then make another, and another, and another, and another…


@rarebirdart Is Our Instagram Winner!

Posted on 17 Sep 16:01
Congratulations to Amber Cunninghamour latest Instagram winner!  Amber is a self-taught artist based in Flower Mound, Texas who makes sculpture out of handmade, paper clay made from shredded and recycled materials.



Amber Cunningham not only taught herself the art of sculpture, but also how to make her own clay, which she dubs "trashclay". Amber says: "I adore sculpting and using my handmade trashclay. I save everything and cringe when I have to throw things away that I know fills up the landfills. I don’t follow a recipe exactly, but it’s mainly shredded, pulverized papers, various adhesives, plaster and water."

 

 

Amber uses various techniques to sculpt her trashclay onto substrates that include canvas, wood, metal or armatures she makes from recycled materials. After her pieces harden in her drying room, she dremels the areas she would like smoothed out before priming, painting and finishing with ArtResin.

Amber says: "I have this fondness for the unruliness and challenge of my textural paper based clay. 
I am an extremely tactile person. I’m affectionate with the people I care about and the material I work with. I love using my hands and feeling the clay change form. Sometimes I even close my eyes as I sculpt allowing my touch to guide over my vision."



Amber first used ArtResin about six or seven years ago after finding it on social media and felt it took her art to another level. She has been experimenting with layers and additives in the resin but still feels she has yet to truly explore possibilities.  Amber says: "I'm starting to see it as an essential step to my sculptural reliefs and will be including and offering it more often for all pieces. I love the clarity and richness that it brings!"


Though Amber juggled creating her art around multiple jobs for many years, her art is now a full-time priority. Like most artists, creating is as necessary for her as breathing: "When I’m not in a flow state of creating or I’ve had a long hiatus (ahem, the past couple of years were stifled a bit) I feel unhealthy. My lungs and heart and brain just don’t seem to function properly."

The response she hopes to evoke in the viewer often depends on the piece: with her @rarebirdart work she hopes to inspire thought and wonder, whereas the commissioned and holiday work she creates through @scatterbirdie has more of a joyful, lighthearted purpose. Amber says: "I want people to laugh and release the heavy."

 

Amber says: "I recently used ArtResin for a 'Creature from the Black Lagoon' commissioned piece and it was perfect for bringing out more depth in his colors and making him look like he had just emerged from the depths! My customers loved it too."



Before Covid, Amber had two booths in Fredericksburg, TX that were open once a month but these days, most of her work sells online through her social media pages and her Etsy shop. She says: "I tend to have a challenge keeping a surplus of inventory since I make everything completely from scratch. I don’t currently use molds, templates, or make prints of my work." Still, Amber is a huge fan of selling face to face and is keeping her eyes and ears open for possible art shows and retail space in her area and as travel becomes more accessible. 


To see more of Amber's work ...
Follow her on Instagram: @rarebirdart
Like her on Facebook: @RareBirdArt
Visit her on Etsy: RareBirdArt

Congratulations on your win, Amber!

To celebrate all of our amazing resin artists, every month we will be sending out a 32 oz kit to a couple of folks who have tagged us on Instagram—and we'll share their work with the world! 



Don't forget, tag YOUR ArtResin work with @art_resin on Instagram, and YOU could be our next winner!!


ArtResin:  Made For Artists, By Artists.

 


How To Paint With Alcohol Ink On Yupo Paper

Posted on 9 Sep 08:04

Have you ever wondered how to paint with alcohol ink? With the right tools and techniques, painting with alcohol ink is fun and easy with stunning results, even for beginners. Alcohol ink's deep, saturated color can be diluted with isopropyl alcohol to increase the transparency. This flexibility means you can create alcohol ink paintings that are soft and ethereal or bright and intensely colorful. Artist Jessica McGaw dropped by ArtResin to demonstrate two different painting techniques using alcohol ink and yupo paper, a smooth, non-porous paper:

1) using a blow tool to create a soft, blended, fluid art painting
2) using various techniques to apply alcohol ink on yupo to create a colorful, abstract collage

Jessica goes over all of the tools you'll need to create a painting and a collage and shares valuable tips from her many years' experience working with alcohol ink and yupo.

Let's get started!



Alcohol Ink Fluid Art Painting

alcohol ink abstract painting on yupo paper


What You Need: 

 ArtResin® Alcohol Ink in blue, purple, green and yellow
• yupo paper
• 5 x needle dropper bottles
• 99% isopropyl alcohol
• alcohol ink blending solution (also known as extender)
• handheld alcohol ink air blower
• cotton pads, to soak up extra ink or alcohol 
• paint palette, for blending colors or to clean off a paintbrush
• gold leaf & gilding paste
• small, fine tipped paint brush
• soft brush for applying gold leaf
• wide brush for sweeping off excess gold leaf 
• microfiber cloth cleaning up gold leaf remnants
• utility knife
• wood panel smaller than your yupo paper
• ArtResin epoxy resin 
 a pair of nitrile gloves, a stir stick and spreader
• a measuring cup with easy to read measurement lines 
• a handheld torch like our Artist's Torch
• toothpicks
• a clean, empty plastic tote to protect your piece while it dries

 

alcohol ink needle point bottles
alcohol ink abstract painting on yupo


1. Fill Your Needle Dropper Bottles


needle point bottles for alcohol ink

You'll need 3 main colors and 1 accent color for this piece: Jessica chose alcohol ink in blue, purple, and green, and accented her piece with yellow that she had dulled down with a little black. The fine tip on these needle bottles drop only a small amount of ink at a time, giving you far more control over your painting and allowing you to react a little quicker. You'll need one bottle per color, one bottle for the isopropyl alcohol and one for the blending solution. 

💡TIP: Choose 3-4 main colors that you know work well together to help achieve soft blends. Some colors can get muddy once combined so do a little experimenting first. 


_________________________________________________________________________

What's the difference between isopropyl alcohol and blending solution?

Both isopropyl alcohol and blending solution will blend colors, increase transparency and revive dried ink, but there are a couple of key differences: 
Isopropyl alcohol increases the fluidity and pushes the alcohol ink so it spreads. It has a short dry time so you need to work quickly and use your blow tool to control the flow of the ink. 
Blending solution is stickier than isopropyl alcohol so will blend the colors without causing them to spread. It doesn't dry as quickly so won't create hard lines between colors which can sometimes happen with isopropyl alcohol.
_________________________________________________________________________

2. Start Your Design


Work on a piece of yupo paper that’s bigger than your panel
 so you have a choice as to what part of the composition you mount. Start with a dot of blue on the page, keeping the dot small and controlled to prevent the ink from spreading.

💡TIP: Alcohol ink dries fast so it's best to w
ork quickly. 


applying alcohol ink to yupo

Next, add a few small drops of isopropyl alcohol in and around the dot to push the ink and guide the colors.

💡TIP:  If the ink or alcohol is flowing too fast from the needle point bottle, fill it up. This will reduce the amount of air in the bottle and slow down the flow.


isopropyl alcohol and alcohol ink on yupo

Add another drop of green next to the first, keeping the colors separate at first so they don't blend together too much. 
Dot more isopropyl alcohol around the drop of green. As you add isopropyl alcohol, the ink gets more diluted which encourages the two colors to blend. 

applying more alcohol ink

Use your hand blower to blend the colors out. If you feel there is too much ink pooling, use a cotton pad to pull out some of the excess ink.

using a hand blower on alcohol ink on yupo paper

Next, add a drop of purple, followed by several small dots of isopropyl alcohol and the hand blower to build your design. The isopropyl alcohol will help the blow tool do its job. If the ink is wet when you add the isopropyl alcohol, it will blend softly.  If it's dry, it won't blend as well and this is when you can end up with jagged edges.

💡TIP: Some jagged lines can look interesting but too many can be visually distracting. For a wispy, ethereal look, soften jagged lines with isopropyl alcohol to blend them out at any time. 


adding alcohol ink to yupo paper


dilute alcohol ink with isopropyl alcohol

Build your design, working your way up the center of the page.  Control the movement by using tiny amounts of alcohol ink and isopropyl alcohol. Be patient and allow the design to develop.

Look for areas that are heavy with ink and dilute them out by adding isopropyl alcohol. When the isopropyl alcohol hits the page, use the blow tool to spread out heavy areas of ink, blending while the ink is wet to prevent heavy lines.

using isopropyl alcohol to blend alcohol ink

use hand blow tool to blend alcohol ink colors

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Why use a hand blower instead of a hair dryer?

• Hair dryers are often used with alcohol ink, but they can dry out the ink very quickly, creating hard lines. A blow tool pushes the color without drying the ink out to achieve a soft, blended look between colors. If you don’t dry your ink as fast, it has more time to settle into the page and blend out nicely for a flowy effect. 
• The point on the blow tool also allows for fine detail work:
blowing little gusts of air around the circle of ink prevents it from spreading too far, whereas blowing in the middle of the dot pushes the color out.

_________________________________________________________________________


use blow tool to blend alcohol ink colors

3. Build Out Your Design


Once your core design is established, begin building the pattern out to the rest of the page.
Add more color, using isopropyl alcohol and the blow tool to blend it out while the ink is still wet, repeating this process to create new and different colors on the page.

Keep the colors balanced:
if you have too much of one color in an area, add some of the other colors to help balance it out. 
Turn the page and look at it from a different perspective to help you decide where you need to build the pattern, soften concentrated areas, fade out color etc. 

 


building an alcohol ink design

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Tips for working with alcohol ink:

• Alcohol ink dries fast so work quickly
• Keep color drops separate and blend using isopropyl alcohol and the blow tool.
• Blend while the inks are wet to achieve a soft look and avoid hard lines between colors. If hard lines do occur, add a few drops of isopropyl alcohol or blending solution to soften them out. 
• The isopropyl alcohol dictates what the ink is going to do: dropping it in the center of the drop will push the ink away. Dropping it around the edges will dilute the ink and create a faded, blended look.
• Focus on small areas at a time, trying not to place too much isopropyl alcohol down at once. If you have excess alcohol or ink, use a cotton pad to pick it up.

"Alcohol inks dry quickly so in some senses you have to make quick decisions. They may not always feel like the right decision at the time but if you keep going with a piece, you can get it to a place where you’ll be happy with it in the end.  Some of the pieces that I’ve made where I've thought they weren’t going to turn out, [I found that] if I just stick with them and keep blending and trying my techniques, it helps them turn out.” - Jessica McGaw

_________________________________________________________________________


drop isopropyl alcohol into alcohol ink to blend colors


4. Add details


Once you're happy with the composition, add fine detail work to create areas of interest. 
This gives you an opportunity to change areas you're not 100% happy with. Stay away from areas that you really like so you don’t accidentally change anything.


Create faded edges to soften harsh lines and fan the colors out. Dot plain isopropyl alcohol onto the page, connecting it up to the edges of the ink color and using the blow tool to gently push it outward. The more isopropyl alcohol you dot around the page, the more it will blend. You can also use a gloved finger to help spread it out to ensure it’s nice and faded. A cotton pad soaks up excess alcohol, helps to soften up the edges and helps it dry.

soften edges of alcohol ink with isopropyl alcohol

Create a wash by diluting blue ink with isopropyl alcohol
so the color is barely there. Wipe it onto a cotton pad, adding the slightest bit of color onto the page to break up the white and give your piece a softer, organic look. Add more dots of isopropyl alcohol around the wash to create a light veining effect, using a cotton pad to blend out any areas that are too harsh.

cotton pad to fade out alcohol ink

Drop isopropyl alcohol in areas where there isn't much color: the alcohol will pick up the ink to create a bubbly texture and a wispy fade.  

use isopropyl alcohol on edge of alcohol ink painting to create a fade

Dot isopropyl alcohol throughout the piece to create visual interest and texture within the ink, keeping the dots small and fairly close together.

creating a pattern with isopropyl alcohol
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Fixing Mistakes

• The great thing about alcohol ink is that it’s not permanent, so it's fairly easy to fix mistakes. 
• If you don't like a certain area, you can correct it by adding a bit of isopropyl alcohol onto a cotton pad and rub at a line to soften or blend it. 
• Remember that l
earning comes from practice and failure. Each time you create a piece you’re not 100% happy with, you learn something. Practice helps you know what to do next. It’s not hard to learn, you just need to stick with it.

There are no rules about how you make these pieces. You kind of have to surrender to the inks a little bit. Sometimes they won’t do exactly what you want, but that’s the beauty of it. Follow the ink and use your blow tool to guide you, but part of this whole process is that you’re giving up a bit of control when you’re using alcohol inks. That’s part of the reason I like them so much.” - Jessica McGaw

_________________________________________________________________________



5. Add Accent Color


An accent color provides a subtle, unexpected pop and creates visual interest.
Choose an accent color that's brighter but still complements your main colors. For our piece, we mixed yellow with a slight amount of black to dull it down so it would flow with the blue, green and purple color palette.

Drop the accent color into the palette using a fine brush, dotting it randomly onto the page wherever it feels like it will work. You can also lightly splatter it onto the page, taking care not to load the brush up too much - you want the splatters to be subtle.

For a softer look, drop isopropyl alcohol in the center of the yellow dots to push the color out, following with the blow tool to fade it out. 


add accent color to alcohol ink painting

6. Seal Your Painting


Wearing a mask, spray Kamar varnish over the entire piece
in a light sweeping motion. Allow it to dry according to label instructions.

spraying varnish on alcohol ink piece
spraying varnish on alcohol ink abstract painting

7. Apply Gold Leaf


A raised gold accent adds texture and visual interest.
 Slowly squeeze gilding paste in an organic fashion to create thin, raised lines. Less is more - you don’t want to overwhelm your piece with gold.
Allow the paste to dry to a point where it’s clear and tacky - approximately 1-2 hours depending on how thick you’ve applied the paste. You'll know the paste is ready for the gold leaf when it's transparent but feels tacky to the touch: if it’s too soft, the relief paste will squish under the gold leaf. If it's too dry, the gold leaf will not adhere.

applying gilding paste to alcohol ink

Apply the gold leaf sheets over the paste. Be aware, gold leaf is somewhat finicky and will fly everywhere as you apply it.


applying gold leaf to alcohol ink abstract painting

Use a soft brush to lift off the excess gold leaf.

use mop brush to pull off excess gold leaf


Use a microfibre cloth to clean up any remaining bits of gold leaf, then a wide, flat brush to sweep up any remaining bits.

use a microfiber cloth to clean up gold leaf
use a wide brush to brush off excess gold leaf

8. Mount Your Painting


The next step is to determine what portion of the artwork you’ll mount onto the wood panel. 
Lay a piece of bristol board over your painting with a window cut to the same dimension as your wood panel: this will help you visualize a composition you like best. Use a pencil to mark the corner points. Line up the canvas with the pencil marks and cut the composition with a utility knife, cutting slightly wider than the panel.


creating a window to determine composition of painting

Apply a layer of gel medium or adhesive evenly to the board
. Line up the paper to the panel as best you can. Press to adhere it, ensuring there are no air pockets and the paper is evenly bonded to the panel.

Once adhered, flip it over and trim the excess paper off with a utility knife so that it matches the size of the panel perfectly.

mount painting to wood panel

cut painting to fit wood panel

 

9. Resin Your Art

 

Wearing gloves, mix up a batch of ArtResin into your mixing cup: measure equal parts of resin and hardener, by volume. Stir for at least 3 minutes, scraping the sides and bottom as you go.


measuring resin in mixing cup
measuring hardener into mixing cup
mixing artresin in cup

Apply ArtResin evenly to the front of your panel using a plastic spreader, nudging the resin right up to the sides without going over. If you wish, you can apply it to the edges using a foam brush or gloved hands. You'll have about 45 minutes of working time before the resin gets too thick to work with.

pouring resin over artwork
spreading resin over artwork

Pass a butane torch over the top of the resined surface quickly to remove any bubbles. Looking under a light source, use a toothpick to remove dust or pop stray bubbles. Cover your resin art with a clean dust cover and allow to dry for 24 hours. The next day, admire your work!  

torching out bubbles from resin on artwork

cover artwork and let it dry for 24 hours

alcohol ink abstract

Alcohol Ink Collage


For this project, Jessica builds an abstract collage using cut outs from 4 different techniques for applying alcohol ink to yupo paper:

1) using a palette knife to push the ink around the page
2) using a brush to create some texture
3) using a foam brush to create a gradient
4) using plastic wrap to create a mosaic texture

alcohol ink collage

What You Need: 

 ArtResin® Alcohol Ink 
• yupo paper
• needle dropper bottles
• 99% isopropyl alcohol
• handheld alcohol ink air blower
• cotton pads, to soak up extra ink or alcohol 
• paint palette, for blending colors or to clean off a paintbrush
• palette knife
• small flat paint brush
• foam brush
• plastic kitchen wrap
• scissors
• utility knife
• wood panel smaller than your yupo paper
• ArtResin epoxy resin 
 a pair of nitrile gloves, a stir stick and spreader
• a measuring cup with easy to read measurement lines 
• a handheld torch like our Artist's Torch
• toothpicks
• a clean, empty plastic tote to protect your piece while it dries


1. Palette Knife Technique



palette knife to apply alcohol ink to yupo paper

Choose 3 colors that work well together:  a good rule of thumb is to choose 2 colors that blend well together, with the third being a contrasting color. For example, use pink, yellow and blue: if the pink and yellow blend, they'll create an orange color. Apply the contrasting color last, just in case it turns any of the colors muddy.

Start with a base of one color, applying a generous amount of ink to the paper. Use a palette knife to drag the ink across the page. This should be a quick, forceful push to disperse the ink and create texture. Don't leave any pools of ink that may spread. Leave some blocks of white for the remaining two colors.

Repeat the same process with the second and third colors, using less ink each time - the contrasting color should be minimal in case it creates any muddiness. It may look really busy but that's ok - you'll be cutting it up and focusing on small areas so don't worry too much if you don't love the color or composition.

 

2. Paintbrush Technique



brushing alcohol ink onto yupo paper

Choose 3 colors maximum to keep it simple, keeping in mind that 2 complimentary colors and 1 contrasting color works best. Add a few drops to a palette, diluting them with some isopropyl alcohol to make them easier to spread.

Load the first color of alcohol ink onto a flat brush and paint in lines across the yupo.
Add some isopropyl alcohol to blend it and create some texture. 

Clean your brush and repeat with the second color. Adding a line of isopropyl alcohol will push the ink upward into the color above to create blended lines. 

Clean your brush again and apply thin lines and dots of the third color throughout as an accent.  

Add isopropyl alcohol to soften out harsh lines and to create visual interest. Add lines or dots of isopropyl alcohol - be generous with it because your goal is to cover the page with texture.

 

3. Foam Brush Gradient





Choose colors that blend well together to avoid any muddiness: we used 2 colors but you can use more if you wish. 

Load the ink colors directly onto a foam brush, saturating it. Drop a small amount of isopropyl alcohol into the sponge brush to help the ink move smoothly across the page.  The more isopropyl alcohol you add, the more diluted the ink color will be. 

Glide the brush across the page in stripes, applying a little bit of pressure. If you end up with concentrated ink on the side of the page, lift it up to prevent it from pooling. 

 

4. Plastic Wrap Technique






Choose two colors that blend well together:
we used blue and yellow and blue and purple.

Apply them in random lines on the page using a foam brush loaded up with ink and isopropyl alcohol or with a flat paintbrush to keep the colors separate. The ink should be fairly saturated so that the page is slightly wet.

Lay a piece of plastic wrap on top of the ink, crinkling it slightly. The wrap will cling to the ink. You can pick the wrap up and reposition it, but make sure it is contact with the entire page.

Once fully dry, remove the plastic wrap and reveal the cool mosaic effect!


Creating The Collage

 

Create your collage on a piece of yupo paper: use white or one that you’ve already washed with color. Trace the wood panel out onto the yupo (slightly larger than the panel itself) and cut it out.

Cut out shapes to create a design that you like: organic shapes or geometric shapes, repeat a pattern of similar sized shapes or vary the sizes. As you cut, look for visually interesting parts of your alcohol ink work and start to plan out your design. Remember, if something isn't working out, it's easy to swap it out.








Use gel medium to affix your design onto the yupo once you're happy with how it looks. Gel medium is like school glue but doesn't yellow. Try not to get gel medium on the ink side of your yupo paper or the ink may run.

Apply a thin, even coat of gel medium over the entire panel. Mount your collage, applying some pressure to ensure a good bond and to remove any air pockets.  

Once mounted, flip it over and use a utility knife to trim off the excess paper.

Seal with a light, even coat of Kamar varnish and allow to dry according to the label directions.



Wearing gloves, mix up a batch of ArtResin into your mixing cup: measure equal parts of resin and hardener, by volume. Stir for at least 3 minutes, scraping the sides and bottom as you go.

Apply ArtResin evenly to the front of your panel using a plastic spreader, 
nudging the resin right up to the sides without going over. If you wish, you can apply it to the edges using a foam brush or gloved hands. You'll have about 45 minutes of working time before the resin gets too thick to work with.




Pass a butane torch over the top of the resined surface quickly to remove any bubbles. Looking under a light source, use a toothpick to remove dust or pop stray bubbles. Cover your resin art with a clean dust cover and allow to dry for 24 hours.



The next day, admire your work!  The resin coat not only makes the color pop, but it brings out some of the finer details in the alcohol ink work.  ArtResin also provides a level of UV protection which helps as alcohol ink is prone to susceptible to fading in bright conditions.




We hope you enjoyed learning all the tips and techniques for applying alcohol ink to yupo paper, and that you're inspired to create a painting or a collage of your own!

Please leave any questions in the comments below. Let us know which technique you liked best!

ArtResin: Made For Artists, By Artists.

 


@platterduran65 Is Our Instagram Winner!

Posted on 1 Sep 22:06

Congratulations to Amanda Duranour latest Instagram winner! Amanda is a self-taught artist from Sydney, Australia who makes beautiful floral inlay charcuterie boards.

 

Amanda's passion for entertaining long provided an opportunity to express her creativity, particularly her cheese and fruit charcuterie boards embellished with greenery and edible flowers. Since she was unable to entertain during lockdown last year, Amanda found herself in need of keeping busy. Inspired by her platters, Amanda had the idea to incorporate flowers into wood boards using resin. She says, "These are difficult times, however, they can present opportunity in many ways." 

 
Amanda says: "So began, during our daily walks, the collection of all the beautiful native wattle, bottlebrush and various flowers that our local birds, especially the cockatoos, break off the trees." Amanda decided to press and dry her flowers - though it's a long process, she felt it yielded the best results. She says: "I had flowers all over the place: in books, under bricks, even under our mattress!"



Amanda's husband, who is a carpenter by trade, helps bring her ideas to life, cutting out shapes in acacia wood, which is also native to Australia.


Amanda started to research products and came across ArtResin. She loves that ArtResin is safe for direct food contact once cured, is easy to work with and, as she creates all of her boards in her home, has a low odour. Amanda says: "I love ArtResin. This product has taken my platters to the next level. The clarity really highlights the natural beauty in the flora, which is truly stunning. When a flower is suspended in the resin, it adds so much depth and dimension to my art, and this gives me the confidence to create ... as we Aussies say 'have a go'."


Amanda says: "I would describe my platters as being rustic, uniquely highlighting the beauty and individual character of the native Australian bush flora coupled with the varying wood grain of the Acacia. Especially when paired with some delicious local produce."



Though Amanda hasn't
 had any formal training, she believes the best way to learn is through hands-on experience. She says, "I found that creating has been great for my wellbeing. I've also started to incorporate flowers into beautiful old fashion cut crystal glasses and platters, which is also stunning. In time, I would love to have a dedicated work space. I’m even dreaming about a room just to dry flowers."



To see more of Amanda's work, follow her on Instagram:
@platterduran65

Congratulations on your win, Amanda!

To celebrate all the amazing artists staying home and creating, every month we will be sending out a 32 oz kit to a couple of artists who have tagged us on Instagram—and we'll share their work with the world!


5 Resin Art Projects For Beginners

Posted on 24 Aug 09:14

Are you new to resin art and looking for a fun, easy way to get started?
Or maybe you already use resin but you'd like a few different project ideas to try?

We know you're going to love these resin art projects with lots of useful tips for working with epoxy resin. Make these pieces as simple or as detailed as you'd like - either way, you'll end up with something you'll be proud to display. We hope they inspire you to start (and continue) getting creative with resin!


1. Textured Resin Art

Create colorful and eye-catching textured art with drywall compound, a wood panel and ArtResin - once you see how easy it is, you'll want to make these over and over again.

What You Need:

  • A wood art panel
  • Drywall compound
  • Spatula or small trowel
  • Acrylic Paint or ResinTint
  • Paintbrushes
  • ArtResin epoxy resin 
  • Disposable gloves
  • Stir Stick
  • Mixing cup with easy to read measurement lines 
  • Foam brush
  • Artist Torch (recommended)
  • A clean box or plastic tote to protect your resin art while it dries


How To Make It:

1. Using a spatula, apply a thick coat of drywall compound to the front and sides of the wood panel. Draw your design into the drywall compound while it's still soft using the handle end of a paintbrush.

2. Using acrylics, paint your color pattern onto the dried plaster design. Allow the paint to dry thoroughly before applying ArtResin. OR if you prefer, you can fill in your design with tinted resin.

3. Wearing gloves, mix up a batch of ArtResin into your mixing cup (equal parts resin and hardener). Stir for at least 3 minutes, scraping the sides and bottom as you go. Apply ArtResin evenly to the front and sides of the panel using a foam brush or gloved hands. 
💡TIP: Use our Resin Calculator and enter the length and width of your piece to determine how much ArtResin you’ll need. 

5. Pass a butane torch over the top of the resined surface quickly to remove any bubbles. Looking under a light source, use a toothpick to remove dust or pop stray bubbles. Cover your resin art with a clean dust cover and allow to dry for 24 hours.

6. Admire your art (and be prepared that you'll want to make more and more!)

Watch the full video:


 


2. Ocean Art

Ocean art involves pouring layers of resin tinted in shades of blue, then finishing with white to replicate wave crests. The color and shine will make you want to dive right in! This technique is fun to watch and even more fun to do - the best part is that no two pieces will look the same.

What You Need: 

  • ArtResin epoxy resin
  • ResinTint liquid colorants
  • a wooden panel, round or square
  • a hairdryer
  • disposable gloves
  • measuring cup
  • small plastic cups and stir sticks, enough for each colour
  • toothpick
  • a piece of plastic to line your work surface with
  • plastic stands to prop your work up on (painter's pyramids or plastic cups)
  • Artist Torch (recommended)
  • dust cover large enough to cover your piece


How To Make It:
 

1. Wearing gloves, mix up a batch of ArtResin into your mixing cup (equal parts resin and hardener). Stir for at least 3 minutes, scraping the sides and bottom as you go.
💡TIP: Enter the dimensions of your panel into our Resin Calculator to determine exactly how much you'll need.

2. Pour the ArtResin into four plastic cups, tinting with ResinTint in light blue, dark blue, white and sand. There's no wrong or right - add and adjust until you see the color you're happiest with. You'll need more resin tinted light blue and dark blue and less of sand and white. 

3. Start with the sand color to create the beach on one edge of the panel, spreading it out and over the sides.

4. On the edge opposite to the sand, pour the darker blue on about half the panel, spreading out and over the sides.

5. Apply the light blue to the remainder of the canvas, blending with the dark blue for an even transition between the two colors. Leave a little separation between the sand and light blue or you'll end up with a muddy look.

6. Drop a thin line of white in the gap between the light blue and the sand, and a second or third line where ever else you want to create a wave.

7. With the hairdryer set on low, stay close to the white resin and push it in and out, spreading it over the blue resin.

8. Use a toothpick to drag through the white seafoam, exaggerating and elongating it through the wave.

9. Torch out any bubbles, cover and allow your piece to cure 24 hours.

10. Admire and enjoy your very own aerial seascape!

    Watch the full video:


    3. Pointillism Art 

    Pointillism is the technique of applying small dots that, when viewed from a distance, blend together to form an image. The technique may seem difficult at first glance, but it really is more time consuming than it is challenging. After watching this video tutorial, anyone will be able to recreate a piece like this.



    What You Need:

    • A 12 x 12" cradled wood panel painted white (a cradled panel has a lip to contain the resin)
    • a selection of markers
    • ArtResin epoxy resin 
    • A pair of nitrile gloves, a stir stick and spreader
    • a measuring cup with easy to read measurement lines 
    • a handheld torch like our Artist's Torch
    • toothpicks
    • a clean, empty plastic tote to protect your piece while it dries


    How To Make It:

    1. Trace or freehand your design directly onto the wood panel and fill it in. Resting your hand on a piece of paper helps keep your artwork clean while you dot your design.

    2. Using our Resin Calculator, enter the length and width of your piece to determine how much ArtResin you’ll need. A standard 1/8" coating for a 12" x 12" panel requires 5 oz resin (2.5 oz resin and 2.5 oz hardener). 

    3. Wearing gloves, mix up a batch of ArtResin into your mixing cup (equal parts resin and hardener). Stir for at least 3 minutes, scraping the sides and bottom as you go. Apply ArtResin evenly to the front and sides of the panel using a foam brush or gloved hands. You can tilt the panel to spread it or use a plastic spreading tool. You'll have about 45 minutes of working time before the resin gets too thick to work with.

    4. Pass a butane torch over the top of the resined surface quickly to remove any bubbles. Looking under a light source, use a toothpick to remove dust or pop stray bubbles. Cover your resin art with a clean dust cover and allow to dry for 24 hours.

    5. Wait 24hrs and then admire your work!  

    Watch the full video:


    4. Petri Dish Art

    Petri Dish Art is made by dropping alcohol ink into ArtResin in a silicone mold. The white ink pushes the colors through the resin creating colorful "petrified" squiggles. This technique might look complicated, but it's actually quite simple and the results are stunning, even for a beginner!

     

    What You Need: 


      How To Make It:

      1. Wearing gloves, mix up a batch of ArtResin into your mixing cup (equal parts resin and hardener). Stir for at least 3 minutes, scraping the sides and bottom as you go.

      2. Pour approximately 3oz of ArtResin into each mold cavity.

      3. Drop your favorite colors of alcohol ink directly from the bottle into your resin. Drop white Alcohol Ink Sinker over your color drops to drive the colors through the resin.
      💡TIP: Use approximately 1 drop of Ink Sinker per 2 drops of alcohol ink.

      4. Cover your mold and leave it to cure overnight.

      5. 24 hours later, remove your cured petri dish art from the silicone mold and see how they turned out!

      6. Do it again and again! Experiment and get funky :)

        Watch the full video:


        5. Alcohol Ink & Yupo Paper Collage

        Yupo paper is a smooth, plastic based paper that makes an ideal painting surface for alcohol ink. This video will show you how to recreate this geometric collage, finishing it with a coat of resin to make the colors pop! There's a lot of flexibility when it comes to creating abstract art, making this an ideal project for every skill level.

        alcohol ink on yupo paper resin art

        What You Need: 


        How To Make It:

        1. Using a paint brush or foam brush, create a series of abstract designs on a few sheets of yupo paper in a variety of color palettes. Here's a chance to get creative by trying out some different techniques:

        • drip the alcohol ink directly out of the bottle, using a brush or tilting the paper to spread it out.
        • load up a foam brush with a few different ink colors to create fun, multi-colored stripes
        • use a palette knife to spread out the ink
        • flick the ink off the bristles of the brush to create splatters
        • spritz rubbing alcohol from a small spray bottle or drip it onto the alcohol ink to create some cool effects.
        • apply the alcohol ink with a cotton ball to create a wash of color.


        2. Once your paintings are completely dry, cut them into geometric or organic shapes. Assemble your collage design and once you're happy with how it looks, glue the pieces one by one onto the wood panel and allow to dry.

        3. Using our Resin Calculator, enter the length and width of your panel to determine how much ArtResin you’ll need. 

        4. Wearing gloves, mix up a batch of ArtResin into your mixing cup (equal parts resin and hardener). Stir for at least 3 minutes, scraping the sides and bottom as you go. Apply ArtResin evenly to the front using a plastic spreader. If you wish, you can apply it to the sides of the panel using a foam brush or gloved hands. You'll have about 45 minutes of working time before the resin gets too thick to work with.

        5. Pass a butane torch over the top of the resined surface quickly to remove any bubbles. Looking under a light source, use a toothpick to remove dust or pop stray bubbles. Cover your resin art with a clean dust cover and allow to dry for 24 hours.

        6. Wait 24hrs and then admire your work! 

        Watch the video, starting at 2:40:

         

        We hope you enjoyed this collection of easy resin ideas for beginners!
        Which one would you like to try first?
        Please leave any questions or comments below.

        ArtResin:  Made For Artists, By Artists.


        @ashli_smith_art Is Our Instagram Winner!

        Posted on 20 Aug 13:43

        Congratulations to artist Ashli Smith, our latest Instagram winner! Ashli is a self-taught, mixed media artist from Florence, Alabama who creates beautiful floral pieces using polymer clay coated in ArtResin. 

         

        Ashli discovered both polymer clay and resin in 2019, shortly after recovering from breast cancer: "One day I was in a craft store and bought a bar of polymer clay to try out and the rest is history...my flowers were born! I also discovered an artist on Instagram that inspired me to try ArtResin. I loved it so much, that I began to finish all of my pieces with a coat or two of resin."
         



        Ashli describes her process: "I start out by making my clay flowers in my home studio...AKA my kitchen counter. Once my flowers are baked and painted, I mount them to wooden birch boards. I then finish each piece in my resin studio...AKA my dining room.  Each piece will get a coat or two of resin. I absolutely LOVE the shine, beauty, and strength resin adds!"

         
        Although Ashli loves working with polymer clay, she also enjoys painting with acrylic.


        Ashli sells her pieces through her Instagram page @Ashli_Smith_Art. She says: "
        One of my favorite things about being an artist is the amazing people and clients that I’ve gotten to meet throughout the Southeast. I am truly the happiest when I’m creating! I find that working with clay and resin are incredibly therapeutic, peaceful, and fun. With a year like 2020, being creative has definitely been a bright spot in my life."

        Congratulations on your win, Ashli!

        To celebrate all the amazing artists staying home and creating, every month we will be sending out a 32 oz kit to a couple of artists who have tagged us on Instagram—and we'll share their work with the world! 


        How To Make A Tiered Resin Tray

        Posted on 10 Aug 19:43

        Tiered resin trays are a simple, elegant way to display desserts, cupcakes, appetizers or hors d'oeuvres. Whether you prefer the look of 2 tiers or 3, handcrafted resin stands are beautiful, easy to make and totally customizable to match the color theme of a baby shower, wedding or special event. 

        In this step-by-step tutorial, resin artist 
        Carmen Darley drops by the ArtResin studio to demonstrate how to use DIY silicone resin molds and ready made molds to create 2 different tiered resin trays:

        • a 2-tier resin stand using ResinTint for a faux marbled effect
        • a 3 tier resin tray made with dried flowers, gold leaf and glitter.

        Let's get started!



        How To Create A Marble Resin Tray

        marble faux epoxy resin tray

        What You'll Need: 

        • ArtResin epoxy resin
        • ResinTint liquid colorants
        • Silicone molds in 2 or 3 different sizes OR make your own with a tube of low odor silicone caulking, a caulking gun and parchment paper
        • 3-Tier Tray Hardware 
        • Screwdriver
        • Electric drill
        • Drill bit the same size as the hardware and a smaller one to drill a sink hole
        • Utility knife, sandpaper or a Dremel for smoothing the edges
        • Nitrile gloves
        • Plastic mixing cup
        • Small plastic cups and stir sticks, enough for each colour of tint used
        • A piece of plastic to line your work surface with
        • Artist's Torch or a heat gun
        • Dust cover large enough to cover your pieces

         

        1. Assemble Your Materials Before You Start:

        Gather your tools before you start so that everything is on hand, including your dust cover.

        assemble tools before you start to resin

        2. Build Your Molds

        You can buy pre-made molds or make your own custom ones. Making your own re-usable molds is easy, allowing you to create layers in any size or shape you wish. You can make custom molds using silicone caulking piped onto a piece of parchment paper or vinyl.

        First, use a pen to sketch out your shapes - you can trace a perfect circle or square or draw a freehand, organic design in any size or shape you wish.  If you're making a multi-tiered tray, make sure you leave a 2 cm difference between each layer.

        build a custom mold silicone caulking trace onto parchment paper

        Place the silicone tube in the caulking gun and cut the tip at the widest part to allow for a nice, thick line. Apply the silicone to the parchment paper, tracing your outlines. Ensure there are no gaps in the mold that the resin could leak out from.

        DIY custom resin mold silicone caulking parchment paper

        Apply a second layer of silicone directly on top of the first. You can apply this right away or if you prefer, wait a few hours until the first layer of silicone has hardened up a bit. 

        build DIY resin silicone mold

        Once the second layer has been applied, let it dry for 24 hours.

        2 layer DIY silicone resin mold

        3. Prepare Your ArtResin And Tints: 

        Measure equal amounts, by volume, of resin and hardener and mix thoroughly for at least 3 minutes, scraping the bottom and sides of the mixing container as you stir. 

        pouring resin into mixing cup
        pouring hardener into mixing cup
        mixing epoxy resin and hardener in cup

        Choose your color palette and divide the resin equally among small plastic cups, allowing one per color. Carmen wanted to replicate the look of marble so chose a white base accented with streaks of black and bronze. 

        Resin Tint colorant for epoxy resin

        Shake the ResinTint bottles well and add a few drops to each cup, mixing well after each addition. ResinTint is a highly saturated, pigment based colorant, so always start with less than you need. You can check the color by pulling some of the tinted resin up the side of your cup. If it's too translucent, add a little more tint.
        💡TIP:  No matter which colorant you use, don't add more than 6% of the total combined volume of resin and hardener.  Too much colorant throws off the delicate balance required for the resin and hardener to cure, and you may end up with resin that doesn't harden.

        mixing tint colorant into epoxy resin

        Mix and match ResinTint to create your own custom colors.  Add a drop of our metallics for a little shimmer or add a drop or two of white for an opaque look.

        mixing colorant into epoxy resin

        4. Pour The Resin

        Here's the fun part!

        Pour the white resin into the center of the mold, in a circular motion. It will self-level but a craft stick helps nudge it evenly to the edges.

        pouring epoxy resin into a coaster mold

        Dip your craft stick into the black tinted resin and swirl it into the white resin to replicate the look of marble. 

        faux marble epoxy resin

        Repeat with the bronze tinted resin.

        how to create marble effect with epoxy resin

        Add a little more black on top of the bronze.  Repeat these steps for the other molds.

        making faux marble with epoxy resin

        5. Torch, Cover And Wait: 

        Run the torch or heat gun very lightly over your design to remove any large bubbles, taking care to avoid the edges of the mold.  This step has the added bonus of softening the blend lines so it really takes on a marble appearance!

        torch bubbles out from resin tray before curing

        Lay your molds on a flat, sturdy surface and cover with a clean cardboard box or plastic tote and allow it to cure.

        6. Remove The Resin From The Molds

        The trays will be dry to the touch at 24 hours, at which point you can gently remove them from the molds and place them somewhere flat to finish curing. Allow at least a week to fully cure before assembling the tray: if you assemble them too soon, gravity may pull the edges down and the layers will not sit flat.

        removing resin from mold

         

        7. Clean Up The Edges

        If you've used a homemade silicone mold with caulking and parchment paper, you may find that the edges are rough and jagged. These can be addressed in two ways:

        1) after unmolding at the 24 hr mark:
         the resin will be flexible enough that a utility knife can be used to carefully remove sharp edges. 

        2) if the layers have cured for 7 days or longer: smooth out the edges with sandpaper or a Dremel tool.

        💡TIP: If you wish, use metallic paint or a metallic paint marker to finish off the edges of your tray.

        clean up rough edges of resin coaster

        sandpaper smooth out rough resin edges

        8. Drill The Holes

        Next, we need to drill holes in the middle of each layer to fit the hardware. Determine the size of the drill bit by matching it to the screw part of the hardware kit. The hole should be the same size or even slightly smaller so that the hardware screws in securely to the resin layer. You also need a smaller drill bit for the pilot hole - drilling a pilot hole first will prevent the resin from cracking.

        assemble resin tiered tray

        match drill bit to hardware kit

        Measure each layer to determine the center point and mark it with a pen.  Starting with the smaller drill bit, slowly drill a pilot hole, then use the larger drill bit to complete the final hole.

        drilling a pilot hole into epoxy resin tiered tray

        drilling hole into epoxy resin tray

        Test your hardware and ensure you can thread the ends through the holes - if not, you can drill again to enlarge the holes as necessary.

         

        9. Assemble The Tray

        Once each layer has its drill hole complete, you're ready to assemble the tray. Thread the hardware through each layer, with the washers in between, and screw it tightly together.  Use the screwdriver to tighten the screw at the bottom.

        assembling epoxy resin tiered tray

        adding hardware to build epoxy resin tiered tray

        10. Use And Enjoy!

        As the top tier has no backing, we recommend placing heavier items on the bottom tier of the tray.


        2 tier resin faux marble tray
        2 tier faux marble epoxy resin tray


        How To Create A Floral Embellished Resin Tray

        epoxy resin tiered tray dried flowers gold leaf

        What You'll Need: 

        • ArtResin epoxy resin
        • silicone molds in 3 different sizes
        • tray hardware
        • glitter, metallic leaf, dried flowers, glass or crystals for embellishing your piece
        • nitrile gloves
        • plastic mixing cup
        • a piece of plastic to line your work surface with
        • an Artist's Torch or heat gun
        • dust cover large enough to cover your piece

         

        1. Assemble Your Materials Before You Start:

        Gather your tools before you start so that everything is on hand, including your dust cover.

        how to make a tiered resin tray

        2. Prepare Your Molds

        You can make your own custom molds you can buy ready made silicone molds especially designed for tiered trays. They often come in sets of 2 or 3 assorted sizes and some even come with the hardware you'll need to build your tray.  These molds have a nub in the center, eliminating the need to drill holes for the hardware.

        silicone mold for tiered tray

         

        3. Prepare Your ArtResin: 

        Measure equal amounts, by volume, of resin and hardener and mix thoroughly for at least 3 minutes, scraping the bottom and sides of the mixing container as you stir. 

        add resin to mixing cup

        adding hardener to resin
        mixing epoxy resin for 3 minutes

        3. Pour The Resin

        Here's the fun part!

        Pour the resin into the center of the mold, in a circular motion. It will self-level but a craft stick helps nudge it evenly to the edges.

        pouring epoxy resin into a silicone mold tiered resin tray

        3. Add Your Embellishments

        Using a pair of tweezers or a craft stick with a bit of resin on the tip, place your inclusions onto the resin surface.  Once you're happy with the placement, use a craft stick to submerge the inclusion into the resin.

        Here's where you can get creative!  Use dried flowers, silk flowers, gold leaf, glitter, crystals, glass .... just ensure whatever you add is thoroughly dry.
        💡TIP:  Try not to move delicate items like dried flowers once you've placed them into the resin as they may break apart.

        adding dried flowers to resin coasters
        adding dried flower inclusions to resin tiered tray
        adding dried flowers to epoxy resin
        decorating resin tray with flower inclusions

        4. Torch, Cover And Wait: 

        Run the torch or heat gun very lightly over your design to remove any large bubbles, taking care to avoid the edges of the mold.

        torch bubbles out of epoxy resin

        Lay your molds on a flat, sturdy surface and cover with a clean cardboard box or plastic tote and allow it to cure.

        4. Remove The Resin From The Molds

        The trays will be dry to the touch at 24 hours, at which point you can gently remove them from the molds and place them somewhere flat to finish curing. Allow at least a week to fully cure before assembling the tray: if you assemble them too soon, gravity may pull the edges down and the layers will not sit flat.

        removing cured resin from mold

        5. Assemble The Tray

        Once each layer has thoroughly cured, you're ready to assemble the tray. Thread the hardware through each layer, with the washers in between, and screw it tightly together. 
        💡TIP:  Because the silicone mold edges are smooth, you won't have to sand down the edges once you unmold the resin layers.  You can, however, finish the edges with metallic paint or a metallic paint marker to add a little sparkle!


        assembling resin tiered tray

        6. Use And Enjoy!

        As the top tier has no backing, we recommend placing heavier items on the bottom tier of the tray.

        put heavy items on bottom of tiered tray


        Didn't these trays turn out beautifully?  Which tray do you prefer?
        We hope you enjoyed watching these two methods and you feel inspired to make your very own, custom made, tiered resin tray!

        how to make resin tiered trays

        Questions or comments?
        Have you made your own tiered resin tray? 

        Let us know in the comments section below!

        ArtResin:  Made By Artists, For Artists.

         


        Alexandra Squire Is Our Instagram Winner!

        Posted on 10 Aug 15:41
        Congratulations to artist Alexandra Squire, our latest Instagram winner! 
        Alexandra is an artist from Maryland who, 5 years ago, took a leap of faith and turned her lifelong passion for art into a full time career. 

          

         

        A self-taught artist, Alexandra has been perfecting her craft since she was a child; first under her grandmother, then taking art classes while pursuing her MBA, and finally, by studying under other respected artists. She works with acrylics and resin, allowing her to experiment with both texture and depth. Alexandra says: "I love what I can capture with paint. Blending colors is my favorite part. I love the idea that I can take a blank canvas and use my imagination to turn it into anything. It will always fascinate me that from three primary colors we can create infinitely more."
         



        Alexandra discovered resin a few years, instantly falling in love with its ability to enhance any artwork: "As silly as it sounds, I also respect resin. There are rules you have to play by. To create the desired effect, I have to be precise in the application and the process. Resin doesn’t allow you to rush or skip steps. It holds you accountable, and I like that. Resin really changed the trajectory of my career. I feel like I can tell much deeper stories with my work when I use resin. It provides a depth that I haven’t been able to achieve before."


        Alexandra spends weeks at a time on a single painting, working slowly and with intention to ensure she gets the results she wants. Color and blending are an integral part of her process. She first sketches out her ideas on her iPad, giving her an opportunity to experiment with a color palette before further testing with paint on small canvases or pieces of wood. If she's happy with the progression at this point, she moves onto wood panels to begin her final piece.

        To achieve the look she's going for, Alexandra incorporates blending at every stage, including the underpainting, starting with darker colors and slowly mixing in lighter colors and shades. Once the painting is thoroughly dry, perfectly clean and dust-free, Alexandra applies a minimum of three coats of ArtResin to give her work a luxurious, thick coat.

         

        Alexandra has built a drying tent in her studio to ensure the work stays free of dust while it cures: "I have to be careful that I don’t lose patience and peek at a piece too soon and kick up any dust that may get into the resin. The process for each piece takes weeks. I will start painting new pieces as other ones dry, but this process doesn’t allow me to crank out new work every day."


        Not only is painting Alexandra's passion, but it's also a way for her to tell stories without words. Although the art eventually becomes public, the process to create it is intimate and therapeutic: "There are very few restraints on what I can do with art. That can be an overwhelming thought, but I also find it comforting. I know I will never run out of ways to express myself. 

        "I hope everyone who views my work takes away something different. My intent is for my art to be a vessel by which they experience their own memories. I hope that by viewing my work all of their senses are engaged. I want my colors, forms, layers, blending, and bold finish to take them back to a time and place that fills them with joy. For me, memories are all about colors and shapes. I hope my audience can feel that when they view my work."

         

        Alexandra has shown her art in galleries (she is currently taking part in a virtual show) but she mainly sells her work through her website, her Instagram page and through word of mouth. Alexandra says "I am also fortunate to have wonderful relationships with some incredible designers who will commission pieces for their clients."


        Visit her website: www.alexandrasquireart.com
        Follow her on Instagram: @alexandrasquireart


        Congratulations on your win, Alexandra!


        To celebrate all the amazing artists staying home and creating, every month we will be sending out a 32 oz kit to a couple of artists who have tagged us on Instagram—and we'll share their work with the world! 

        Don't forget, tag YOUR ArtResin work with @art_resin on Instagram, and YOU could be our next winner!!


        ArtResin:  Made For Artists, By Artists.


        Dueling Paintbrushes

        Posted on 28 Jul 08:04

        Welcome to Dueling Paintbrushes!

        This series pits 2 creative artists against each other with limited time and limited resources.

        Dave and Rebecca are both skilled artists who—what, with co-running a business, and a home, and co-parenting—rarely get a chance to dabble with artistic pursuits these days. So we decided to have a little fun.

        Episode 4 - With Special Guest Dan Rodo

        Episode 4 features a surprise guest - mixed media artist and YouTube influencer Dan Rodo - who dropped by ArtResin HQ to battle the clock and Dave and Rebecca. 



        The three artists had 30 minutes to complete their work, but this episode has a surprise twist halfway through ....

        Once you watch the video, please vote or comment on our YouTube channel as to who you think won the competition.
        Was it Rebecca, Dan or Dave?  Place your vote by August 8th!


        May the best artist win!

        Episode 3 - A Picture Is Worth 2 Words

        In Episode 3, we changed things up yet again. This round we left the door open for Dave and Rebecca to use any art supplies in the room.
         


        The catch?

        The inspiration for their art piece will be 2 random words that they must select from a pile in front of them.

        And as always, they had to do it in 30 minutes.


        Again it was highly entertaining to watch these two artists race against the clock to try and "out-duel" each other. It was another successful experiment that we hope you, at home, will take part in.

        Once you watch the video, please vote or comment on our YouTube channel as to who you think won the competition. Was it Rebecca and her "Drink Special" or Dave and his "Eye Test." *Voting for this episode has closed.

        Also, please let us know if you'd like to see more of these competitions. Once things settle down in the world around us, we hope to open our doors and invite other artists to join in on the competition where everyone's a winner :)

        Enjoy!

         

        Episode 2 - No Paintbrush. No Problem.


        In Episode 2, we switched things up. This round we provided a bin filled with materials that they had to use to create their artwork. No other art supplies could be used.

         


        They had no paintbrush.

        No art direction.

        And they had to do it in 30 minutes.


        Voting has finished for this episode but the response has been great! Thank you to everyone watching this series. Hopefully you have fun watching or playing along as we have so much fun creating it :)

         

        Episode 1 - The Pilot Episode

        The premiere episode. The one that started it all.

        We came up with this series for a few reasons:

        1) We wanted to entertain you
        2) We wanted to inspire you
        3) We wanted to showcase the beauty of interpretation
        4) We wanted to watch mommy and daddy compete! These two are highly, HIGHLY competitive people.

         


        To start this series off, we chose an image, separated the two of them and asked them to create their own masterpiece based off of that image. In 30 minutes.

        What followed was a plethora of action, sass, creativity, stress, inspiration, you name it! It was truly a fun experiment that we hope you, at home, will enjoy.

        Stay tuned for more as we continue to challenge Dave and Rebecca and perhaps a few surprise guests.

        Til then...