Blog

@penaynayjane Is Our #ArtResin Instagram Winner For January!

Posted on 14 Jan 08:50

Every month we like to spread the love by sending a 1 gallon kit to a couple of artists who have tagged us on Instagram ... and then we share their work with the world!  

Congratulations to artist Penny Heather ... our first lucky winner of 2020!
Penny is a full time artist based in New Brunswick.  Having studied fine art at Bishops University, she turned her passion for creating soulful pieces of art into a successful business.




Every now and again, we come across an Instagram post that makes us stop in our tracks: such was the case when we saw Penny Heather's incredible resin sculptures. Commissioned by Big Brothers and Big Sisters to award community youth mentors, each piece is a labour of love.

"I was approached by BBBS when they were looking for an artist to create awards to give their recipients that would be something unique, and more meaningful to their good deeds than a traditional plaque. I knew they wanted an artwork, but a painting just didn’t feel right to me for the occasion. All I had was a whisper of an idea for a type of sculpture I'd never made before. They agreed, and the rest was history."



To make these sculptures, Penny first creates a large, custom made mold into which she embeds a large piece of locally sourced silver maple into ArtResin that she pours into the mold layer by layer. Once fully cured, Penny cracks the mold and cuts the large casting down into smaller, individual pieces.

Watch the video below to see Penny unmolding her cured casting:



Penny cuts the casting based on the pattern compositions within the piece, choosing shapes to compliment each sculpture's individual features. 

 

Next, with a lot of sanding, Penny refines each piece into smooth, organic shapes until they become something otherworldly. 





Last, Penny restores the resin's transparency revealing secret, hidden worlds within. The fluidity of the resin allows for ethereal patterns to form as it cures, juxtaposing the ruggedness of the raw wood. Standing approximately 6" x 14" tall and weighing about 5 lbs, each sculpture presents a uniquely beautiful shape, wood grain and colour. 



 


Penny says: "I love creating them because they have a mind of their own: they decide what they want to look like and I have to surrender, which is sort of the opposite of when I paint. I could never recreate it exactly, even if I tried. 

"From the very first series of sculptures I made, creating these has excited me for their possibilities and nuances, they terrify me for all that can (very expensively) go wrong during the creation process, but most of all they just fascinate me. They’re just kind of a lovely, nerve-wracking, mad science experiment every time and I absolutely love making them."


 

Penny says: "I am inspired by my impressions of nature & landscapes, and how these impressions allow me to connect with others who share similar experiences. Creating art is a meditation; a compass to navigate my subconscious thoughts, where recurring patterns become apparent in a visual way that I can share for others to interpret on their own. For me, art is an energy transfer between the artist and the viewer. I hope that my work can take the viewer somewhere peaceful in their mind; a feeling, a memory, even a dream." 

Penny discovered ArtResin a couple of years ago as a way of finishing a jellyfish painting, the resin providing a finish that echoed the aquatic theme of the painting.
"The resin enriched and deepened the colours and, to my surprise, really brought out the wood grain of the paintings background, which is one of the distinctive features of my work. I was hooked!"









"As I became more experienced in using resin I also became curious about how far I could take the medium. Since then I have had many triumphs and failures as I experiment in my work, resin has helped me expand my confidence in exploring new mediums."







Congratulations on your win, Penny!


To see more of Penny's beautiful work:
visit her website: 
pennyheatherart.com
follow her on Instagram: @penaynayjane
like her Facebook page: @pennyheatherart



Don't forget ... tag YOUR ArtResin work with @art_resin on Instagram, and YOU could be our next monthly winner!!!


Have A Canvas You Want To Resin?

Posted on 13 Jan 08:44

You don’t have to be a professional artist to get the sleek look of epoxy resin on your artwork: it provides a modern, glossy, finish to paintings, photographs, prints, drawings, wood, metal and more. 

Artist Allyson Reeves always wanted to try ArtResin on one of her abstract acrylic paintings but was a bit intimidated, so we invited her to spend some time with ArtResin's Joanne to help demystify the process. 

Within 30 minutes, Allyson was measuring, mixing and pouring like a pro.

Though the idea of applying epoxy resin may seem a bit daunting, ArtResin was designed by artists who understand what artists want:

  • a product designed specifically for artwork
  • a safe and easy application
  • and most importantly, pro results. 

This video will show how simple ArtResin is when you follow a few key steps: measure, mix, pour, spread, cover and you’ll wonder why you haven’t been using it all along!

Let's get started ...

 

What You'll Need: 

  • ArtResin epoxy resin
  • plastic container for water bath ( optional )
  • paper towel
  • masking tape 
  • cardboard 
  • compressed air canister to eliminate surface dust from artwork ( optional )
  • plastic stands to prop up artwork ( pyramids, plastic cups, lego )
  • level 
  • nitrile gloves ( a must! )
  • plastic measuring cup ( or 2-3 clear plastic drinking glasses )
  • stir stick
  • a spreading tool ( ArtResin's Reusable Spreader works great! )
  • an Artist's Torch
  • toothpicks
  • dust cover large enough to fit your piece ( a cardboard box or a plastic tote )

 

1. Assemble Your Materials:


Gather together your ArtResin and your tools before you start resining: you want to make sure you have everything you need on hand so you can measure, mix, pour and spread ArtResin with ease and efficiency.


    Line your work surface with plastic for easy clean up and to protect your table top: a vinyl shower curtain makes an easy, inexpensive liner that can be re-used again and again. Resin drips can either be wiped clean with paper towel and isopropyl alcohol or, if allowed to dry, can be peeled off the next day.


      A torch is the very best way to zap bubbles
       out of wet resin for a flawless finish. Our butane powered Artist's Torch ( pictured below ) is perfect for most jobs. For larger pieces, you may want to look into a propane powered torch.   



      Use hard plastic tools:
      epoxy resin doesn't stick to plastic making clean up a breeze and allowing you to re-use your tools indefinitely. We like using hard plastic mixing cups, stir sticks, stands, and spreaders like our jagged Reusable Spreader, pictured below.



      Have a dust cover ready to go:
      you never want to leave your wet, freshly resined piece sitting out while you look for a cardboard box or plastic tote to fit your piece.



        2. Prepare Your Artwork:


        Make sure your artwork is dry and dust free: a soft brush or canister of compressed air can help eliminate dust.


        Decide if you want to resin the entire painting ( i.e including sides ) or if you only want to resin the top: applying resin to the top of your artwork while leaving the sides unresined is referred to as doming.
        Since Allyson's painting wrapped around the sides of the canvas, she decided to resin the entire piece. 

        💡 TIP: 
        Read more about how to dome in our blog What Is Doming Resin? 


         

        If you want to resin the sides, we always advise taping off the bottom of your piece:  Why tape the bottom? As gravity pulls the resin down the sides, drips will naturally start to accumulate along the bottom of your piece. Tape will catch the drips. Once the resin is dry to the touch, you can pull the tape off and the drips right along with it. 



        Stretched canvases should be reinforced: the weight of epoxy resin can cause stretched canvas to sag and, consequently, the resin to pool in the centre. To prevent this, cut a piece of cardboard to size and insert it in the back to provide strength and stability.




        Prop your piece up on plastic stands: propping up your piece allows drips to pool on the plastic lined work surface. Epoxy resin won't adhere to plastic stands so you can easily peel off resin drips once dried. 



        Ensure your work is perfectly horizontal by checking it with a traditional level or with ArtResin's mobile phone level: 
        www.artresin.com/level




        2. Prepare Your ArtResin


        It's important that both ArtResin and your resin room is at least room temperature or warmer.  Epoxy resin loves warm temperatures, so 75-85F or 24-30C is absolutely ideal.  During the cold winter months, it's a good idea to increase the temperature of your resin room before you start to resin and, if your ArtResin is cold, you may choose to give your bottles a warm water bath before you measure and mix. It's important to prevent any water from getting into the resin: keep the caps on, don't submerge the bottles and dry the bottles off thoroughly before you open them. 

        💡 TIP: See our blog Should I Warm Epoxy Resin In A Water Bath? for more information and helpful tips.

         




        Measure equal parts by volume: ArtResin is a 1:1 epoxy resin, meaning that you need equal parts of resin and hardener measured by volume. To determine how much ArtResin you will need for your piece, enter the length and the width into the Resin Calculator on our website. 

        For example, Allyson's 12"x12" piece requires 5 oz total, made up of 2.5 oz of resin and 2.5 oz of hardener.



          Wearing gloves, measure equal amounts of resin and hardener: it doesn't matter which one you start with, as long as you measure equal amounts of both. You can pour the resin and hardener ( one at a time ) into a measuring cup OR you can measure the resin and hardener in two separate cups and then pour into a third cup for mixing.
          It's important to measure accurately: if your resin and hardener are not perfectly equal, your resin may not cure properly. 




          Mix thoroughly for at least 3 minutes: as you stir, scrape the sides and bottom of the cup to ensure you incorporate every last bit of resin and hardener. Mixing thoroughly and scraping the sides will ensure every last bit of resin and hardener are combined: under mixing may lead to curing issues so this is an important step. 
          Now you're ready to pour!

          💡 TIP: for our very best measuring and mixing tips, read the blog How To Measure And Mix Resin And Hardener.




          3. Pour The Resin

          Pour the mixed ArtResin onto the centre of your piece and spread it out to the edges using a plastic spreader: you'll have about 45 minutes of working time before the resin gets too thick to work with.

          💡TIP: Read our blog How To Pour And Spread Epoxy Resin for more resin tips and techniques!



          Use the spreader to gently pull a little resin over the edges and down the sides of your piece.  Using gloved hands, smooth the resin out, evenly coating each side.



          5. Torch, Cover And Wait: 

          Using an Artist’s Torch, hold the flame a couple of inches above the resin surface just long enough to pop the bubbles. One or two passes with the torch is all you need to get rid of bubbles.

          💡TIP: if you're nervous about using a torch, don't be! Read our blog with all you need to know about How To Use A Torch On Epoxy Resin.



          Keep
           the torch in a constant side to side motion, as if you're ironing clothes. Don't hold the flame too close - it should just lightly kiss the resin surface.





          Use a toothpick to pop any missed bubbles or to fish out any bits of dust:
            look at your resin under a light source and at eye level to easily spot any imperfections.





          Cover and wait 24 hours:
          using a clean plastic tote or cardboard box ( with the flaps cut off ), cover your piece and let it sit for 24 hrs until it’s dry to the touch.  Last step is cleaning your tools: we like to wipe our tools down with isopropyl alcohol and paper towel until all traces of resin have been removed.  Dried resin can be peeled off of plastic tools, liners and stands. For more tips on how to clean your tools, check out our blog How Can I Clean Epoxy Resin Mixing Containers?

          💡TIP: the resin will be dry to the touch at the 24hr mark.  At this point, you're free to hang your artwork on the wall but if you're planning on packing and shipping your artwork, please wait at least 72hrs until the resin has fully cured.




          6. Reveal!

          Absolutely gorgeous!
          ArtResin took Allyson's vibrant acrylic paintings next level, giving them a professional looking finish and a glossy sheen that makes colour pop!





          We hope you found this tutorial informative and helpful. More importantly, we hope it made the process of applying epoxy resin a little less intimidating. Like anything, practice makes perfect but these suggestions will give you a good head start:

          • have everything you need ready to go: tools laid out & artwork prepped
          • ensure your ArtResin and resin room is 75-85F or 24-30C
          • measure accurately, mix thoroughly, scrape your container as you stir
          • use a torch and dust cover

          Before you know it, you'll be applying ArtResin over ALL of your favourite art pieces!

          Questions?  Comments?  Tips?
          Please leave them below!

          To see more of Allyson's artwork:
          visit her website at www.allysonreeves.ca
          follow her on instagram at @allyson_schmidt_reeves

          Happy Holidays From ArtResin!

          Posted on 16 Dec 16:14
          It's the most wonderful time of the year, friends.

          From our ArtResin family to yours, we wish YOU a happy holiday season and a New Year filled with joy!




          ArtResin: Made For Artists, By Artists.

          @ellis.artworks Is Our #ArtResin Instagram Winner For December!

          Posted on 16 Dec 14:16
          Every month we like to spread the love by sending a 1 gallon kit to a couple of artists who have tagged us on Instagram ... and then we share their work with the world!  

          Congratulations to artist Shawn Ellis ... our second lucky winner for December!  A self-taught artist based in Vernon, British Columbia, Shawn designs and wood burns intricate mandalas onto wood panels which he seals with a layer of shiny ArtResin.



          Shawn designs each mandala, one at a time, outlining them first in pencil onto the wood panel. He says:  "My process is pretty natural. I don't like to have anything specific in mind when I start a Mandala; I prefer to let my emotions and inner self take over and guide the design. I often hide numerology throughout my art, for a variety or reasons. The over all piece, is usually like a journal of what's going on in my life whole I work on that piece. I only work on one project at a time, as I like each piece to capture a moment in my life."


          On this piece, Shawn placed the design in order to highlight the pattern of the wood grain:

           

          Next, he burned the design into the wood using a wood burning tool:

           


          Finally, Shawn applied a layer of ArtResin to seal his work, providing a glossy finish that enhances both the pyrography and the wood grain.


          In Shawn's words: "ArtResin has elevated my art. I was always intimidated to try it for some reason, but seeing how it enhances my paintings and especially my pyrography has made it my favourite part of the process. I love resin day, and even more, I love reveal day! That's when all my hard work pays off, and my piece is completely finished/sealed with its ArtResin finish. I love it, and so do my amazing clients."



          Shawn says: "My art is a therapeutic expression for me, that's why I started. Being the father to a special needs child, I needed something I could do for self care, and it all started with painting. After losing my son in 2017, art has been more important than ever to me. I dedicate myself to each piece, and try to take all the grief in my heart, and turn it into something beautiful that both the viewer and I can find comfort in. Expression is such an important part of handling my grief and anxiety, and art has given me an outlet to positively move forward through some difficult life experiences. Every time I finish a piece, I'm blown away by the support I receive from strangers across the globe. It's such a rewarding feeling when people I've never met take the time to comment on my art and have such lovely things to say. It definitely keeps me pushing myself to be a better artist."

           

          Different wood burning tips allow Shawn to create simple line designs to highly detailed pieces with shading and a variety of tonal lines:



          Before focusing on pyrography, Shawn painted his mandalas in acrylic on canvas: 
           
           


          Shawn often paints on layers of cured ArtResin with acrylic paint pens to create depth and make the mandala look like it's floating:


          Though Shawn will always incorporate art as part of his life and self-care routine, he hopes that his mandala work's current momentum carries him towards a career as a full time artist. 

           

          To see more of Shawn's beautiful work:
          follow him on Instagram at 
          @ellis.artworks

          Don't forget ... tag YOUR ArtResin work with @art_resin on Instagram, and YOU could be our next monthly winner!!!


           


          How To Avoid Reflections When Photographing Resin Art

          Posted on 5 Dec 12:41
          While a few reflections are an advantage to show off ArtResin's shine, its high gloss finish can sometimes cause challenging reflections and hotspots. With a few simple and effective techniques for proper lighting and camera positioning, you can capture shots of your artwork like a pro:

          • Work in a controlled environment ( close curtains, turn off room lights )
          • Set up 2 bright lights on either side of your artwork at 45 degree angles
          • Set up your artwork so that it's at a perfectly parallel angle to your camera lens
          • Take a few test shots and adjust your lights and artwork to eliminate reflections
          • Once you're happy with what you see, you're ready to shoot!


          Great shots of your artwork is an important marketing tool for any artist.   Photographer Geoff George shares his techniques for proper lighting and camera positioning so that you can capture shots of your artwork like a pro! With Geoff's simple, inexpensive and effective set up, you'll never have to settle for shots with too much glare again.

          1. Work in a controlled environment: taking a shot with both studio lights and ambient lighting ( daylight or from lamps/ceiling lights ) can cause glare and uneven lighting. Close curtains and blinds and adjust room lights as necessary in order to control all the light hitting your piece.

          2. Set up your lighting: to get an equal, even wash of light, set up two identical lights on either side of your artwork at 45 degree angles. Use the brightest lights you can and ensure both lights are the same in order to provide even amounts and even colour. Never use your camera's flash or light your work from the same angle as the camera or else you'll end up with a hot spots in your work.

          3. Set up your artwork: Whether you hang your artwork, lean it on a wall, or lay it on the floor, it's important that the camera is positioned at a perfectly parallel angle and that the lens is centred to the middle to avoid making your piece look distorted. Using a tripod locks the camera in and offers the most control.

          4. Adjust your lights and your artwork for reflections: examine the way your artwork looks through the lens, identifying any unwanted sources of light and finding a way to minimize them. You may need to adjust the positioning of your lights or adjust your artwork.

          5. Take a few test shots: once you're happy with what you see, you're ready to shoot!

          6. Work in a controlled environment: taking a shot with both studio lights and ambient lighting ( daylight or from lamps/ceiling lights ) can cause glare and uneven lighting. Close curtains and blinds and adjust room lights as necessary in order to control all the light hitting your piece.

          7. Set up your lighting: to get an equal, even wash of light, set up two identical lights on either side of your artwork at 45 degree angles. Use the brightest lights you can and ensure both lights are the same in order to provide even amounts and even colour. Never use your camera's flash or light your work from the same angle as the camera or else you'll end up with a hot spots in your work.

          8. Set up your artwork: Whether you hang your artwork, lean it on a wall, or lay it on the floor, it's important that the camera is positioned at a perfectly parallel angle and that the lens is centred to the middle to avoid making your piece look distorted. Using a tripod locks the camera in and offers the most control.

          9. Adjust your lights and your artwork for reflections: examine the way your artwork looks through the lens, identifying any unwanted sources of light and finding a way to minimize them. You may need to adjust the positioning of your lights or adjust your artwork.

          10. Take a few test shots: once you're happy with what you see, you're ready to shoot!

          How To Make Epoxy Resin Matte

          Posted on 5 Dec 09:08
          Epoxy resin is valued for its high gloss protection but, from time to time, you may prefer the look of something less shiny on your artwork. The matting agents typically used with epoxy resin are highly toxic, but with some sandpaper, wax and a little elbow grease you can create a gorgeous non-gloss finish, without any chemicals or solvents.



          Here's how:

          1. Using a spray water bottle, generously spray down the surface of your artwork ( wet sanding helps prevent micro dust particles from scratching the resin surface, giving you a much finer, smoother finish than dry sanding. )
          2. Wearing a dust mask, sand down the wet resin surface with 320 grit sandpaper, either by hand or with an electric sander. You'll notice that a paste begins to form: when the paste becomes thick and dry, you'll know it's time to stop.
          3. Generously spray down the sanded surface and, using a piece of lint free paper towel, wipe off all of the paste. Spray once again and repeat, spraying and wiping 2-3 times until the surface is perfectly smooth and you can no longer see any scratch marks.
          4. Repeat the process 2-3 times with the 600 grit sandpaper before moving onto the 1500 grit. Ensure the resin surface is evenly sanded and smooth before moving on to the next grit. If there are any scratch marks you can't get rid of, you may need to jump back to the previous grit and sand some more.
          5. Once you've removed all sanding marks, spray with water and wipe. Repeat this process until all traces of sanding residue have been removed.
          6. Dry your piece thoroughly. Then, with a dry, soft, lint-free cloth, apply a generous coat of wax and spread it evenly across the entire surface of the resin. Use a fresh cloth, apply firm pressure and rub in a circular motion to polish your piece. Stop polishing whenever the finish is as smooth as you'd like it to be. If there is any haze left on your piece, use a fresh cloth to wipe it off. You can use an electric polisher at this point but be aware that the resin will get shinier and shinier as you polish it.

          Voila! You now have a beautiful, silky smooth, matte finish on your artwork!


          For full step-by-step instructions, see our blog How To Get A Matte Resin Finish.

          What's The Cure Time Of ArtResin Epoxy Resin?

          Posted on 3 Dec 16:04
          ArtResin's cure time is about 24 hours: this refers to the period of time it takes for the product to go through the chemical reaction that takes it from a liquid to a solid.

          After about 24 hours, ArtResin will be at about a 95% solidity rate: at this point, it will be hard to the touch and you can hang your artwork on the wall. ArtResin is fully cured over the next 2 days, when curing reaches the 72 hour mark. At this point, you can go ahead and package and ship your artwork without risk of damaging the resin surface.  



          Want to make resin cure faster?
          Check out our blog How To Make Resin Cure Faster.

          Shipping your artwork?
          Learn the dos and don'ts in our blog What's The Best Way To Pack Resin Art For Shipping

          ArtResin: Made For Artists, By Artists.

          How Can I Increase The Value Of My Artwork?

          Posted on 3 Dec 14:08
          ArtResin instantly increases the value of any artwork by making the colors pop and giving it a rich, dramatic look. It also has a professional feel so people don’t need to frame the artwork once they’ve purchased from you. ArtResin is a great investment for any artist: instead of paying for framing, customers can take that money and put it into your pocket. 



          ArtResin: Made For Artists, By Artists.

          @cami.levin.art Is Our #ArtResin Instagram Winner For December!

          Posted on 2 Dec 16:56
          Every month we like to spread the love by sending a 1 gallon kit to a couple of artists who have tagged us on Instagram ... and then we share their work with the world!  

          Congratulations to artist Cami Levin ... one of our lucky winners for December! Cami is an mixed media artist based in Dana Point, CA.  She is the owner of Pacific Gallery, where she carries functional art handmade by more than 50 artists.

          Raised in Southern California, Cami was exposed to art and creativity at a young age. After graduating college with a Psychology degree, she soon realized that her passion was creating art. Self-taught, 
          Cami experimented with many different styles and mediums before finding her voice in the color, pattern and texture of mixed media art. Her work is heavily influenced by nature and the nostalgia of her childhood.



          The Trees of Love pieces are decorated with symbols of hope, love, happiness and stories of life. 
          Cami says, "I'm inspired by imagination. I love creating a physical version of what's inside my imagination.








          Cami has been creating her Trees of Love wall pieces for about 8 years in 6 different sizes ranging from 10x10" to 30x30". They start with a tree base and background painted onto a wood panel.



          Every circle on every tree is individually sculpted out of clay and textured by hand.



          Cami hand paints each clay circle and mounts them one by one on to the painted wood panel.



          She adorns them with found objects including gem stones, flowers, crystals, vintage keys, beads, hex nuts, etc.




          Once complete, the tree is coated in ArtResin, embedding each object and creating an irresistible shine. In Cami's words: "Resin has taken my artwork to a whole new level since I've been using it the past 8 years. I love that it permanently embeds every element added to my work, brings out the colors, and gives it a unique, glassy appearance."




          Cami puts an incredible amount of effort into each clay circle to ensure that they are all wonderfully unique: the results are beautiful.







          Cami says: "I'm excited to be expanding my line in 2020 to include other images, like figures with their 'hair' created in a similar fashion to the clay circles on my trees."






          Cami created one of her trees on a surfboard for the Ritz-Carlton Holiday surfboard Art auction.



          Cami is 
          currently featured at the Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel, CA with 10 of her large trees in an exhibit entitled "The Nature of Circles".  She sees herself continuing to create more mixed media/resin trees as well as expanding into other images of mixed media/resin.

          To see more:
          follow Cami on Instagram at @cami.levin.art
          visit her website at 
          www.pacificgallery.net

          Don't forget ... tag YOUR ArtResin work with @art_resin on Instagram, and YOU could be our next monthly winner!!!


          How To Shape Resin

          Posted on 2 Dec 15:23

          Epoxy resin is such a versatile product: once cured, it's as hard as a rock but before it reaches that point, ArtResin is quite flexible and can be shaped and molded to create free standing resin bowls, dishes and vases. 

          Resin artist Carmen Darley has been working with resin to create elegant home decor items such as coasters, geodes, serving trays and wedding favors. In this tutorial, she guides us step-by-step to tinting, pouring and shaping ArtResin to create a resin vase and a trinket dish. 

          Creating free form resin art in any shape, size or color combination you like is easy and fun!

          Take a peek ....

           

          How To Create A Resin Free-Form Vase:

           

           

          What You'll Need: 

          • ArtResin epoxy resin
          • ResinTint liquid colorants
          • glitter or metallic leaf for embellishing your piece
          • a vase or other hard form on which to shape your resin
          • nitrile gloves
          • plastic mixing cup
          • small plastic cups and stir sticks, enough for each colour of tint used
          • a piece of plastic to work on ( a cut piece of vinyl shower curtain works great )
          • an Artist's Torch
          • dust cover large enough to cover your piece
          • scissors for trimming drips

           

          1. Assemble Your Materials Before You Start:

          Gather your tools so that everything is on hand before you start, including your dust cover.





          2. Prepare Your ArtResin And Tints: 

          Measure equal amounts, by volume, of resin and hardener and mix thoroughly for at least 3 minutes, scraping the bottom and sides of the mixing container as you go.

          Divide the resin equally among small plastic cups, allowing one per color. After you mix in the tint, ensure the resin sits and thickens for 15 minutes before you start to create your design. If you try to pour right after mixing, the resin will be too fluid: you'll end up with muddy colours and could lose your design.

          Shake the ResinTint bottles well and use a few drops to tint each cup of resin, mixing well after each addition. Don't be afraid to mix and match to achieve the colours you wish to use.  

          We used: 

          • teal
          • blue
          • white
          • clear ( no tint added )


          ResinTint is a highly saturated pigment based colorant, so it's always best to start with less than you need, adding more as necessary. Check the transparency by using the mixing stick to pull some of the tinted resin up the side of your cup: if the tint is too translucent, add a little more until you're happy with what you see.


          💡TIP:  No matter which colorant you choose to use, don't add more than 6% of the total combined volume of resin and hardener.  Adding more than 6% will throw off the delicate balance required for the resin and hardener to cure, and you may end up with resin that doesn't harden.




          3. Pour The Resin

          Here's the fun part!
          After your resin has had a chance to sit and thicken, you're ready to pour.
          Start with the color you want in the center of your piece. Make sure you leave some gaps to fill in with white and clear resin.





          Build your piece out by pouring the second color around the first and again, leave some negative space to fill in with white and clear resin.



          Finally, fill in the gaps with white and clear resin until the piece has even resin coverage throughout. If you wish, you can use a spreader to blend your colors or allow the blending to occur organically.  



          4. Add embellishments:

          Add any inclusions you wish to use to the center or perimeter of your piece including:

          • metallic leaf
          • glitter
          • beads
          • crystals 
          • dried leaves or flower petals
          • any flat inclusion you wish ... you're limited only by your imagination!


           

          5. Torch, Cover And Wait: 

          Lightly run the torch over your design to remove any large bubbles: leaving small bubbles replicates the look of glass so feel free to leave them in. Move your piece onto a flat, sturdy surface to dry, if necessary.

          Cover your piece with a dust cover and allow your piece to cure for 2-3 hours until it's dry to the touch. 




          6. Shape & Mold Your Resin:

          Once your piece has cured until it's fairly dry to the touch ( very lightly tacky is ok ) lift the entire piece of shower curtain and drape it over your vase. 




          Pinch the edges to create fluted corners if you wish, and tuck the extra plastic underneath the vase, creating some tension to maintain the shape. If desired, apply a second square of plastic on top to help keep the resin in place.
          Allow the resin 24 hours to finish curing.





          7. Unmold Your Resin:

          The next day, when the resin has finished its initial cure, you can unmold your piece. First, remove the top layer of plastic ( if used ) and then flip your mold over and carefully remove the plastic from the center of your piece: it should pull away quite easily.



          8. Finish The Edges:

          Using scissors, trim away any drips or thin edges. If the edges of your piece are sharp, use a file or some sandpaper to dull them down. Using a fine brush, apply a coat of gold paint to the edges to complete your piece.




          Here's the finished piece!






          How To Create A Trinket Dish:



          What You'll Need: 

          • ArtResin epoxy resin
          • ResinTint liquid colorants
          • glitter or metallic leaf for embellishing your piece
          • a silicone mold 
          • 2 identical dishes, bowls, dinner plates or tin pie plates for shaping your piece
          • a plastic lined work surface
          • nitrile gloves
          • plastic mixing cup
          • small plastic cups and stir sticks, enough for each colour of tint used
          • an Artist's Torch
          • dust cover large enough to cover your piece
          • scissors for trimming drips

          1. Assemble Your Materials Before You Start:

          Gather your tools so that everything is at hand before you start, including your dust cover.


          2. Prepare Your ArtResin And Tints: 

          Measure equal amounts, by volume, of resin and hardener and mix thoroughly for at least 3 minutes, scraping the bottom and sides of the mixing container as you go. Divide the resin equally among small plastic cups, allowing one per color. Shake the ResinTint bottles well and use a few drops to tint each cup of resin, mixing well after each addition. Don't be afraid to mix and match to achieve the colours you wish to use.  

          We used: 

          • teal mixed with a few drops of white
          • purple mixed with a few drops of white
          • clear ( no tint added )


          ResinTint is a highly saturated pigment based colorant, so it's always best to start with less than you need, adding more as necessary. Check the transparency by using the mixing stick to pull some of the tinted resin up the side of your cup: if the tint is too translucent, add a little more until you're happy with what you see.


          💡TIP:  No matter which colorant you choose to use, don't add more than 6% of the total combined volume of resin and hardener.  Adding more than 6% will throw off the delicate balance required for the resin and hardener to cure, and you may end up with resin that doesn't harden.





          3. Pour The Resin

          Here's the fun part!
          Start by pouring your color choices along the edges of your piece, allowing them to naturally blend together. Leave the middle of the mold for the clear resin pour.




          Once you've poured your colors around the edges and are happy with the look, fill in the center with clear resin. 



          4. Torch: 

          Lightly run the torch over your design to remove any large bubbles - if you wish to leave them, small bubbles replicate the look of glass. 

          5. Add embellishments:

          Add any inclusions you wish to use to the center of your piece including:

          • metallic leaf
          • glitter
          • beads
          • crystals 
          • dried leaves or flower petals
          • any flat inclusion you prefer ... you're limited only by your imagination!



          6. Touch up, cover and wait:

          Using a spreader, ensure you have even coverage over the entire surface of the mold, including the edges. Torch again as necessary, cover and allow to cure 6-8 hours until the piece is fairly dry to the touch.



          7. Unmold Your Resin:

          Once the piece has cured enough to handle ( approximately 6-8 hours after pouring ) carefully remove it from the mold. It should be pliable enough to bend in half without breaking.





          8. Shape & Mold Your Resin:

          Place the resin onto the base plate. Ensure it's flat and centered. Run your hands over it to ensure there are no air pockets.



          Place the top plate on top of the resin. Be aware that any markings or texture on the base of the top plate will imprint the resin, so choose carefully.  



          Place a weight on top of the plates and allow to cure for 24 hours.



          9. Unmold Your Resin:

          After the 24 hour mark, remove the resin from the two plates. If the resin was fairly dry to the touch, you should have no problem removing it from the plates. You can see that the bottom of the silicone mold imparted a matte finish to the resin - conversely, a mold with a glossy finish would give a glossy finish.



          10: Finish The Edges:

          Using scissors, trim away any drips or thin edges. If the edges of your piece are sharp, use a file or some sandpaper to dull them down. Using a fine brush, apply a coat of gold paint to the edges to complete your piece.



          We hope you enjoyed these fun and easy ways to make elevated resin decor from everyday objects you may already have around the house. 

          Looking for more free-form resin projects?
          Check out Carmen's quick tips on how she makes resin geode coasters:





          Have you created free-form resin decor?  

          We'd love to hear - let us know in the comments below!

          To see more of Carmen's artwork, follow her on Instagram:
          @carlipaintings


          ArtResin:  Made For Artists, By Artists.