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How To Avoid Reflections When Photographing Resin Art

Posted on 5 Dec 12:41
While a few reflections are an advantage to show off ArtResin's shine, its high gloss finish can sometimes cause challenging reflections and hotspots. With a few simple and effective techniques for proper lighting and camera positioning, you can capture shots of your artwork like a pro:

  • Work in a controlled environment ( close curtains, turn off room lights )
  • Set up 2 bright lights on either side of your artwork at 45 degree angles
  • Set up your artwork so that it's at a perfectly parallel angle to your camera lens
  • Take a few test shots and adjust your lights and artwork to eliminate reflections
  • Once you're happy with what you see, you're ready to shoot!


Great shots of your artwork is an important marketing tool for any artist.   Photographer Geoff George shares his techniques for proper lighting and camera positioning so that you can capture shots of your artwork like a pro! With Geoff's simple, inexpensive and effective set up, you'll never have to settle for shots with too much glare again.

  1. Work in a controlled environment: taking a shot with both studio lights and ambient lighting ( daylight or from lamps/ceiling lights ) can cause glare and uneven lighting. Close curtains and blinds and adjust room lights as necessary in order to control all the light hitting your piece.

  2. Set up your lighting: to get an equal, even wash of light, set up two identical lights on either side of your artwork at 45 degree angles. Use the brightest lights you can and ensure both lights are the same in order to provide even amounts and even colour. Never use your camera's flash or light your work from the same angle as the camera or else you'll end up with a hot spots in your work.

  3. Set up your artwork: Whether you hang your artwork, lean it on a wall, or lay it on the floor, it's important that the camera is positioned at a perfectly parallel angle and that the lens is centred to the middle to avoid making your piece look distorted. Using a tripod locks the camera in and offers the most control.

  4. Adjust your lights and your artwork for reflections: examine the way your artwork looks through the lens, identifying any unwanted sources of light and finding a way to minimize them. You may need to adjust the positioning of your lights or adjust your artwork.

  5. Take a few test shots: once you're happy with what you see, you're ready to shoot!

  6. Work in a controlled environment: taking a shot with both studio lights and ambient lighting ( daylight or from lamps/ceiling lights ) can cause glare and uneven lighting. Close curtains and blinds and adjust room lights as necessary in order to control all the light hitting your piece.

  7. Set up your lighting: to get an equal, even wash of light, set up two identical lights on either side of your artwork at 45 degree angles. Use the brightest lights you can and ensure both lights are the same in order to provide even amounts and even colour. Never use your camera's flash or light your work from the same angle as the camera or else you'll end up with a hot spots in your work.

  8. Set up your artwork: Whether you hang your artwork, lean it on a wall, or lay it on the floor, it's important that the camera is positioned at a perfectly parallel angle and that the lens is centred to the middle to avoid making your piece look distorted. Using a tripod locks the camera in and offers the most control.

  9. Adjust your lights and your artwork for reflections: examine the way your artwork looks through the lens, identifying any unwanted sources of light and finding a way to minimize them. You may need to adjust the positioning of your lights or adjust your artwork.

  10. Take a few test shots: once you're happy with what you see, you're ready to shoot!

How To Make Epoxy Resin Matte

Posted on 5 Dec 09:08
Epoxy resin is valued for its high gloss protection but, from time to time, you may prefer the look of something less shiny on your artwork. The matting agents typically used with epoxy resin are highly toxic, but with some sandpaper, wax and a little elbow grease you can create a gorgeous non-gloss finish, without any chemicals or solvents.



Here's how:

  1. Using a spray water bottle, generously spray down the surface of your artwork ( wet sanding helps prevent micro dust particles from scratching the resin surface, giving you a much finer, smoother finish than dry sanding. )
  2. Wearing a dust mask, sand down the wet resin surface with 320 grit sandpaper, either by hand or with an electric sander. You'll notice that a paste begins to form: when the paste becomes thick and dry, you'll know it's time to stop.
  3. Generously spray down the sanded surface and, using a piece of lint free paper towel, wipe off all of the paste. Spray once again and repeat, spraying and wiping 2-3 times until the surface is perfectly smooth and you can no longer see any scratch marks.
  4. Repeat the process 2-3 times with the 600 grit sandpaper before moving onto the 1500 grit. Ensure the resin surface is evenly sanded and smooth before moving on to the next grit. If there are any scratch marks you can't get rid of, you may need to jump back to the previous grit and sand some more.
  5. Once you've removed all sanding marks, spray with water and wipe. Repeat this process until all traces of sanding residue have been removed.
  6. Dry your piece thoroughly. Then, with a dry, soft, lint-free cloth, apply a generous coat of wax and spread it evenly across the entire surface of the resin. Use a fresh cloth, apply firm pressure and rub in a circular motion to polish your piece. Stop polishing whenever the finish is as smooth as you'd like it to be. If there is any haze left on your piece, use a fresh cloth to wipe it off. You can use an electric polisher at this point but be aware that the resin will get shinier and shinier as you polish it.

Voila! You now have a beautiful, silky smooth, matte finish on your artwork!


For full step-by-step instructions, see our blog How To Get A Matte Resin Finish.

What's The Cure Time Of ArtResin Epoxy Resin?

Posted on 3 Dec 16:04
ArtResin's cure time is about 24 hours: this refers to the period of time it takes for the product to go through the chemical reaction that takes it from a liquid to a solid.

After about 24 hours, ArtResin will be at about a 95% solidity rate: at this point, it will be hard to the touch and you can hang your artwork on the wall. ArtResin is fully cured over the next 2 days, when curing reaches the 72 hour mark. At this point, you can go ahead and package and ship your artwork without risk of damaging the resin surface.  



Want to make resin cure faster?
Check out our blog How To Make Resin Cure Faster.

Shipping your artwork?
Learn the dos and don'ts in our blog What's The Best Way To Pack Resin Art For Shipping

ArtResin: Made For Artists, By Artists.

How Can I Increase The Value Of My Artwork?

Posted on 3 Dec 14:08
ArtResin instantly increases the value of any artwork by making the colors pop and giving it a rich, dramatic look. It also has a professional feel so people don’t need to frame the artwork once they’ve purchased from you. ArtResin is a great investment for any artist: instead of paying for framing, customers can take that money and put it into your pocket. 



ArtResin: Made For Artists, By Artists.

@cami.levin.art Is Our #ArtResin Instagram Winner For December!

Posted on 2 Dec 16:56
Every month we like to spread the love by sending a 1 gallon kit to a couple of artists who have tagged us on Instagram ... and then we share their work with the world!  

Congratulations to artist Cami Levin ... one of our lucky winners for December! Cami is an mixed media artist based in Dana Point, CA.  She is the owner of Pacific Gallery, where she carries functional art handmade by more than 50 artists.

Raised in Southern California, Cami was exposed to art and creativity at a young age. After graduating college with a Psychology degree, she soon realized that her passion was creating art. Self-taught, 
Cami experimented with many different styles and mediums before finding her voice in the color, pattern and texture of mixed media art. Her work is heavily influenced by nature and the nostalgia of her childhood.



The Trees of Love pieces are decorated with symbols of hope, love, happiness and stories of life. 
Cami says, "I'm inspired by imagination. I love creating a physical version of what's inside my imagination.








Cami has been creating her Trees of Love wall pieces for about 8 years in 6 different sizes ranging from 10x10" to 30x30". They start with a tree base and background painted onto a wood panel.



Every circle on every tree is individually sculpted out of clay and textured by hand.



Cami hand paints each clay circle and mounts them one by one on to the painted wood panel.



She adorns them with found objects including gem stones, flowers, crystals, vintage keys, beads, hex nuts, etc.




Once complete, the tree is coated in ArtResin, embedding each object and creating an irresistible shine. In Cami's words: "Resin has taken my artwork to a whole new level since I've been using it the past 8 years. I love that it permanently embeds every element added to my work, brings out the colors, and gives it a unique, glassy appearance."




Cami puts an incredible amount of effort into each clay circle to ensure that they are all wonderfully unique: the results are beautiful.







Cami says: "I'm excited to be expanding my line in 2020 to include other images, like figures with their 'hair' created in a similar fashion to the clay circles on my trees."






Cami created one of her trees on a surfboard for the Ritz-Carlton Holiday surfboard Art auction.



Cami is 
currently featured at the Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel, CA with 10 of her large trees in an exhibit entitled "The Nature of Circles".  She sees herself continuing to create more mixed media/resin trees as well as expanding into other images of mixed media/resin.

To see more:
follow Cami on Instagram at @cami.levin.art
visit her website at 
www.pacificgallery.net

Don't forget ... tag YOUR ArtResin work with @art_resin on Instagram, and YOU could be our next monthly winner!!!


How To Shape Resin

Posted on 2 Dec 15:23

Epoxy resin is such a versatile product: once cured, it's as hard as a rock but before it reaches that point, ArtResin is quite flexible and can be shaped and molded to create free standing resin bowls, dishes and vases. 

Resin artist Carmen Darley has been working with resin to create elegant home decor items such as coasters, geodes, serving trays and wedding favors. In this tutorial, she guides us step-by-step to tinting, pouring and shaping ArtResin to create a resin vase and a trinket dish. 

Creating free form resin art in any shape, size or color combination you like is easy and fun!

Take a peek ....

 

How To Create A Resin Free-Form Vase:

 

 

What You'll Need: 

  • ArtResin epoxy resin
  • ResinTint liquid colorants
  • glitter or metallic leaf for embellishing your piece
  • a vase or other hard form on which to shape your resin
  • nitrile gloves
  • plastic mixing cup
  • small plastic cups and stir sticks, enough for each colour of tint used
  • a piece of plastic to work on ( a cut piece of vinyl shower curtain works great )
  • an Artist's Torch
  • dust cover large enough to cover your piece
  • scissors for trimming drips

 

1. Assemble Your Materials Before You Start:

Gather your tools so that everything is on hand before you start, including your dust cover.





2. Prepare Your ArtResin And Tints: 

Measure equal amounts, by volume, of resin and hardener and mix thoroughly for at least 3 minutes, scraping the bottom and sides of the mixing container as you go.

Divide the resin equally among small plastic cups, allowing one per color. After you mix in the tint, ensure the resin sits and thickens for 15 minutes before you start to create your design. If you try to pour right after mixing, the resin will be too fluid: you'll end up with muddy colours and could lose your design.

Shake the ResinTint bottles well and use a few drops to tint each cup of resin, mixing well after each addition. Don't be afraid to mix and match to achieve the colours you wish to use.  

We used: 

  • teal
  • blue
  • white
  • clear ( no tint added )


ResinTint is a highly saturated pigment based colorant, so it's always best to start with less than you need, adding more as necessary. Check the transparency by using the mixing stick to pull some of the tinted resin up the side of your cup: if the tint is too translucent, add a little more until you're happy with what you see.


💡TIP:  No matter which colorant you choose to use, don't add more than 6% of the total combined volume of resin and hardener.  Adding more than 6% will throw off the delicate balance required for the resin and hardener to cure, and you may end up with resin that doesn't harden.




3. Pour The Resin

Here's the fun part!
After your resin has had a chance to sit and thicken, you're ready to pour.
Start with the color you want in the center of your piece. Make sure you leave some gaps to fill in with white and clear resin.





Build your piece out by pouring the second color around the first and again, leave some negative space to fill in with white and clear resin.



Finally, fill in the gaps with white and clear resin until the piece has even resin coverage throughout. If you wish, you can use a spreader to blend your colors or allow the blending to occur organically.  



4. Add embellishments:

Add any inclusions you wish to use to the center or perimeter of your piece including:

  • metallic leaf
  • glitter
  • beads
  • crystals 
  • dried leaves or flower petals
  • any flat inclusion you wish ... you're limited only by your imagination!


 

5. Torch, Cover And Wait: 

Lightly run the torch over your design to remove any large bubbles: leaving small bubbles replicates the look of glass so feel free to leave them in. Move your piece onto a flat, sturdy surface to dry, if necessary.

Cover your piece with a dust cover and allow your piece to cure for 2-3 hours until it's dry to the touch. 




6. Shape & Mold Your Resin:

Once your piece has cured until it's fairly dry to the touch ( very lightly tacky is ok ) lift the entire piece of shower curtain and drape it over your vase. 




Pinch the edges to create fluted corners if you wish, and tuck the extra plastic underneath the vase, creating some tension to maintain the shape. If desired, apply a second square of plastic on top to help keep the resin in place.
Allow the resin 24 hours to finish curing.





7. Unmold Your Resin:

The next day, when the resin has finished its initial cure, you can unmold your piece. First, remove the top layer of plastic ( if used ) and then flip your mold over and carefully remove the plastic from the center of your piece: it should pull away quite easily.



8. Finish The Edges:

Using scissors, trim away any drips or thin edges. If the edges of your piece are sharp, use a file or some sandpaper to dull them down. Using a fine brush, apply a coat of gold paint to the edges to complete your piece.




Here's the finished piece!






How To Create A Trinket Dish:



What You'll Need: 

  • ArtResin epoxy resin
  • ResinTint liquid colorants
  • glitter or metallic leaf for embellishing your piece
  • a silicone mold 
  • 2 identical dishes, bowls, dinner plates or tin pie plates for shaping your piece
  • a plastic lined work surface
  • nitrile gloves
  • plastic mixing cup
  • small plastic cups and stir sticks, enough for each colour of tint used
  • an Artist's Torch
  • dust cover large enough to cover your piece
  • scissors for trimming drips

1. Assemble Your Materials Before You Start:

Gather your tools so that everything is at hand before you start, including your dust cover.


2. Prepare Your ArtResin And Tints: 

Measure equal amounts, by volume, of resin and hardener and mix thoroughly for at least 3 minutes, scraping the bottom and sides of the mixing container as you go. Divide the resin equally among small plastic cups, allowing one per color. Shake the ResinTint bottles well and use a few drops to tint each cup of resin, mixing well after each addition. Don't be afraid to mix and match to achieve the colours you wish to use.  

We used: 

  • teal mixed with a few drops of white
  • purple mixed with a few drops of white
  • clear ( no tint added )


ResinTint is a highly saturated pigment based colorant, so it's always best to start with less than you need, adding more as necessary. Check the transparency by using the mixing stick to pull some of the tinted resin up the side of your cup: if the tint is too translucent, add a little more until you're happy with what you see.


💡TIP:  No matter which colorant you choose to use, don't add more than 6% of the total combined volume of resin and hardener.  Adding more than 6% will throw off the delicate balance required for the resin and hardener to cure, and you may end up with resin that doesn't harden.





3. Pour The Resin

Here's the fun part!
Start by pouring your color choices along the edges of your piece, allowing them to naturally blend together. Leave the middle of the mold for the clear resin pour.




Once you've poured your colors around the edges and are happy with the look, fill in the center with clear resin. 



4. Torch: 

Lightly run the torch over your design to remove any large bubbles - if you wish to leave them, small bubbles replicate the look of glass. 

5. Add embellishments:

Add any inclusions you wish to use to the center of your piece including:

  • metallic leaf
  • glitter
  • beads
  • crystals 
  • dried leaves or flower petals
  • any flat inclusion you prefer ... you're limited only by your imagination!



6. Touch up, cover and wait:

Using a spreader, ensure you have even coverage over the entire surface of the mold, including the edges. Torch again as necessary, cover and allow to cure 6-8 hours until the piece is fairly dry to the touch.



7. Unmold Your Resin:

Once the piece has cured enough to handle ( approximately 6-8 hours after pouring ) carefully remove it from the mold. It should be pliable enough to bend in half without breaking.





8. Shape & Mold Your Resin:

Place the resin onto the base plate. Ensure it's flat and centered. Run your hands over it to ensure there are no air pockets.



Place the top plate on top of the resin. Be aware that any markings or texture on the base of the top plate will imprint the resin, so choose carefully.  



Place a weight on top of the plates and allow to cure for 24 hours.



9. Unmold Your Resin:

After the 24 hour mark, remove the resin from the two plates. If the resin was fairly dry to the touch, you should have no problem removing it from the plates. You can see that the bottom of the silicone mold imparted a matte finish to the resin - conversely, a mold with a glossy finish would give a glossy finish.



10: Finish The Edges:

Using scissors, trim away any drips or thin edges. If the edges of your piece are sharp, use a file or some sandpaper to dull them down. Using a fine brush, apply a coat of gold paint to the edges to complete your piece.



We hope you enjoyed these fun and easy ways to make elevated resin decor from everyday objects you may already have around the house. 

Looking for more free-form resin projects?
Check out Carmen's quick tips on how she makes resin geode coasters:





Have you created free-form resin decor?  

We'd love to hear - let us know in the comments below!

To see more of Carmen's artwork, follow her on Instagram:
@carlipaintings


ArtResin:  Made For Artists, By Artists.


@4cornerart Is Our #ArtResin Instagram Winner For November!

Posted on 11 Nov 15:26

Every month we like to spread the love by sending a 1 gallon kit to a couple of artists who have tagged us on Instagram ... and then we share their work with the world!  

Congratulations to mixed media artist Cor Beattie  ... our first lucky winner for November! Cor is based in Ottawa, Ontario and balances his love of painting with a love of sports and a full time career. Self-taught, Cor's artistic journey began by adding "paint a painting" to his annual bucket list. Once it was complete, Cor was hooked and has been creating art ever since.  

 

Cor has experimented with several different styles over the years, including concrete and figurative work, but what resonates with him most is the open interpretation that abstract art provides for both painter and viewer. Cor says: "I always return to abstract acrylic work. I love that my emotions, expressions or vision for a piece may be totally different from the collector purchasing the piece. For that reason, I almost never share my reasoning or story behind a piece. I want each person to have a unique experience, thus making it an internal and personal journey."

Cor creates for one primary reason: to bring affordable beauty into people's lives.  In fact, it means so much to him that he has even incorporated it as the mission statement on his website. The homepage reads: "A major part of my creative journey is to ensure that colorful, rich and original art is available and affordable to everyone.  Regardless of their situation, everyone deserves beautiful things in their lives."

 

 

 

 


 

 

 


Cor first discovered resin about 9 years ago when he was looking for a varnish alternative - once he tried it, there was no going back.  He says "I loved having "a new look" back then. No one had seen this before and reactions were amazing.  Everyone wanted to touch! Colors popped, details were enhanced and mistakes were nicely covered up. It was a slice of heaven and the ease of use is so satisfying." 

When Cor started his artistic journey, pouring and fluid art were becoming popular.  Although he enjoyed the look of flow art, Cor wanted to find other ways of achieving the end result, but with a higher level of control: "By chance, I came across a video for cake decorating that showed a technique using a small bottle with a needle on top, allowing the artist a phenomenal amount of control over the details of their piece. I was instantly sold. I bought cake bottles, medical syringes and never looked back. Took a lot of experimentation with consistencies and needle sizes but I love the fact that I can create pieces that have a sketch, plan or solid vision behind them. Nothing is left to chance. I can achieve a very fine level of detail which as a control freak can be very useful. I use brushes both big and small to add fine details or remove areas that don't satisfy my perfectionism."

Cor is currently creating techniques to make fine lines and designs in his resin work too. 

 

 

 



Cor also creates textured pieces by pouring a thin coat of fine concrete onto a wooden panel. Using a variety of tools, including forks, knives, buttons, fencing, shoe soles, wheels, screwdrivers etc, Cor imprints patterns into the wet concrete. Once the impressions are complete, the pieces are left to dry for a couple of days before getting 4-5 layers of paint and varnish over the course of a few days.  Finally a thin layer of ArtResin is applied by hand to strengthen and protect. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Cor has a unique way of curing his resin pieces to control temperature, dust and humidity ... he cures them in a small bathroom. 
  • First, he mists the air with a spray water bottle to reduce dust.
  • Next, he dehumidifies the room for an hour.
  • The freshly resined piece goes in and is covered by a massive old TV box which he has cut the back out of. Cor places plastic sheets over the opening to prevent any dust getting in.   
  • He then places a rotating space heater on and closes the door.
The piece is hard to the touch in about 7 hours. 

 

 

 

 

Cor gets immense satisfaction in meeting his customers and hearing their feedback and can often be found at local shows in the Ottawa area. Cor says: "When I decided to continue my creative journey back in 2010, I had to sit myself down and decide who I wanted to be: a hobby artist or a professional artist. In my opinion, I couldn't be both. Not at the same time anyway. So, when I decided to give this all a real go, I hit the pavement and must have walked into about 100 cafes, restaurants, and bars asking for an opportunity to display my pieces. I invested in 1000 post cards and mailed them out to businesses, galleries and well known affluent homes in the region introducing myself. I created a website, Instagram page and a Facebook presence. My marketing and advertising degree sure came in handy.  Since then, I participate in about 8 shows a year, I am in 3-4 establishments around the city and am a represented artist at The Koyman Galleries (Canada's Largest Commercial Gallery) since 2018. I am so grateful to those that have supported me up until this point.  Who knows how long it will last.  Got to make the best while it's within reach!"

 

Congratulations on your win, Cor!

To see more of Cor's work:
follow him on Instagram at @4cornerart
visit his website at www.cor1000.com
 

Don't forget ... tag YOUR ArtResin work with @art_resin on Instagram, and YOU could be our next monthly winner!!!


@jessicadadiomoff is our #ArtResin Instagram Winner For October!

Posted on 28 Oct 15:23

Every month we like to spread the love by sending a 1 gallon kit to a couple of artists who have tagged us on Instagram ... and then we share their work with the world!  

Congratulations to Florida artist Jessica Dadiomoff ... one of our lucky winners for October!

 


Jessica is a mixed media artist based in Port Saint Lucie, Florida. A self-taught painter who studied art in university, Jessica incorporates a combination of inks, tints, pigment powders and acrylics in her work to create gorgeous resin seascapes for the past four years.  Jessica says: "My process and choice of mediums have evolved greatly and continue to do so. With every single piece I’m reminded that I am always learning - that is what keeps me excited about creating." 

Jessica's resin seascapes are inspired by the beauty, power and fluidity of the ocean:  "I spend countless hours gazing into the sea, visually studying her dynamic patterns of light and shadow, her ever-changing color and form, and delighting in the perfect balance of rhythm and impermanence in her water. The ocean soothes my soul. She entrances and inspires me in a way that I cannot articulate with words - this is where my process begins."

 

 





A yogi, Jessica's creative process is meditative and always starts with a yoga practice to clear her mind. It has the added benefit of keeping her body limber and strong in order to stand over her work for hours at a time.   

"
Yoga teaches me to let go which breaks through barriers of self doubt or frustration that may arise while I am creating. Initially, I may have an idea for the overall composition of the piece, however it always evolves as each layer is poured. This is where I have to surrender. If I let go of those initial expectations, the piece grows organically into something much more beautiful than I had planned.

However, if I try to control the outcome, I often become frustrated and have to let the resin cure before sanding off layers to rework the piece. Letting the process flow freely without expectation is challenging but adds to the excitement of watching a piece evolve."





 

Jessica created her oceanscapes with acrylics and oil but the discovery of resin four years ago has enabled her to completely transform and evolve her own unique style.  In Jessica's words: "Resin resembles the transparent nature of water - what is underneath, what is in, and what surrounds it is how it is perceived. Light and color travel through it to create beautiful shadows and dimension. Resin has given me the ability to let go and surrender to the control of the medium’s natural movement - which organically creates seascapes that embody fluid oceanic beauty by its own virtue."

Once Jessica finds inspiration for a painting, she and her husband build a wood panel, onto which she paints her base colors. Once the paint has dried, Jessica begins the process of building her resin layers. She starts with the ocean floor, incorporating shadows and movement to replicate the undertow. Next, she builds water layers one by one, adding translucent inks and tints to each resin pour to create depth and dimension, before finishing off the last layers with whitewater details. After the piece has fully cured, she gently sands and cleans the piece before pouring a final resin topcoat for a perfect, glassy finish.










This year Jessica started her career as a full time artist and with this has come some challenges that she hadn't anticipated.  Jessica says "before, I couldn’t quite grasp how far painting for a living would actually push me outside of my comfort zone on so many levels. Right now, I am still working to find a balance between creating for the love of creating while also meeting the demands of managing the business side of art. I know this challenge is not unique to me, however I couldn’t fully understand it before experiencing it." 

Jessica's work has been shown in a few galleries on the East Coast, but most of her sales are commissioned pieces. Her clients have found her oceanscapes through word-of-mouth, social media, and through her website. 

To see more:
follow Jessica on Instagram at @jessicadadiomoff
visit her website at www.jessicadadiomoff.com
 

 

Don't forget ... tag YOUR ArtResin work with @art_resin on Instagram, and YOU could be our next monthly winner!!!

 


How To Create Resin Flow Art

Posted on 28 Oct 11:01

Flow art, also known as fluid art or pour painting, is a technique that uses a liquid art material's natural flow to create an abstract design. In resin flow art, layers of tinted resin are poured in an organic pattern onto a surface creating a colourful, finished piece of artwork with endless possibilities. Resin flow art is easy, fun and the results are stunning, even for beginners!

Mixed media artist Yolanda Fernandes has been working with resin for years to create flow art and home decor items. With lots of great tips, including how to create a customized colour palette, Yolanda guides us through the resin flow art process from start to finish. 

Learn how addictive this popular method can be!

 



How To Create A Resin Flow Art Tray:

Here's what you'll need:

  • ArtResin epoxy resin
  • a metal tray
  • ResinTint liquid colorants
  • a spreader to blend your tinted resin
  • nitrile gloves
  • plastic mixing cup
  • small plastic cups and stir sticks, enough for each colour of tint
  • a plastic drop sheet to line your work surface
  • an Artist's Torch
  • dust cover large enough to cover your piece

 


1. Assemble Your Materials Before You Start:

Gather your tools so that everything is at hand before you start, including your dust cover.

Keep your background in mind when composing your design and choosing your colour palette: for example, if your background is white, you can get away with translucent colours whereas a dark or metallic background will get best coverage from opaque colours. 



2. Prepare Your ArtResin And Tints: 

Measure equal amounts, by volume, of resin and hardener and mix thoroughly for at least 3 minutes, scraping the bottom and sides of the mixing container as you go.

Divide the resin equally among small plastic cups, allowing one cup per color.




Shake the ResinTint bottles well and use a few drops to tint each cup of resin, mixing well after each addition. Don't be afraid to mix and match to achieve the colours you wish to use.  

We used: 

  • dark blue ( with a couple of drops of black to make it a bit darker )
  • white
  • turquoise with a little white added to increase the opacity
  • gold


ResinTint is a highly saturated pigment based colorant, so it's always best to start with less than you need, adding more as necessary. Check the transparency by using the mixing stick to pull some of the tinted resin up the side of your cup: if the tint is too translucent, add a little more until you're happy with what you see.


💡TIP:  No matter which colorant you choose to use, don't add more than 6% of the total combined volume of resin and hardener.  Adding more than 6% will throw off the delicate balance required for the resin and hardener to cure, and you may end up with resin that doesn't harden.








3. Pour The Resin

Here's the fun part!
Start with your darkest colour first, navy blue in our case, and pour on the side of the tray closest to you.



Next, pour the white on the opposite side.

 


If you choose, you can vary the opacity of the white, layering the two whites to create depth and a marbled effect. 
Use a spreader or tilt the tray to move the tint around and change the shape.




Next, add a ribbon of turquoise alongside the blue: apply some on the the tray and overlap some on the dark blue.  Finally, fill in the empty space with gold.  Tilt the tray or use the spreader to ensure there are no bare spots.

Use your Artist's Torch to remove bubbles.

Allow the resin to sit for about 15 minutes before you blend.  Doing this will allow cells to develop and allow the resin to thicken up, slowing down the movement to keep your design intact.



4. Create Your Design:

Ensure the resin has had a chance to sit and thicken for 15 minutes before you start to create your design. If you try to blend right away, the resin is too fluid: you'll end up with muddy colours and you'll lose your design.

Gently run a spatula through the resin to create a pattern, blending the colours organically. Use slow movements, but don’t be afraid to dig a little deeper to pull the colours out so that they can blend. Because the resin has thickened, it will keep the shape you create



5. Torch, Cover And Wait: 

Lightly run the torch over your design one more time to remove any remaining bubbles.  Cover your piece with a dust cover and allow your piece to cure for 24 hours until it's dry to the touch. 



Here is the finished piece!





How To Create A Resin Flow Art Panel:

Here's what you'll need:

  • ArtResin epoxy resin
  • a wood Art Panel 
  • painter's tape to create a lip if your panel doesn't have one
  • ResinTint liquid colorants
  • a spreader to blend your tinted resin
  • nitrile gloves
  • plastic mixing cup
  • small plastic cups and stir sticks, enough for each colour of tint
  • a plastic drop sheet to line your work surface
  • an Artist's Torch
  • dust cover large enough to cover your piece



1. Prepare Your Resin And Your Panel:

Gather your tools so that everything is at hand before you start, including your dust cover.

Paint your wood panel with white acrylic paint, if desired and allow to thoroughly dry.  If your panel doesn't have a lip on it to contain the resin, create one with painter's tape, allowing at least a 1/4" lip around the perimeter of the panel.

Measure equal amounts, by volume, of resin and hardener and mix thoroughly for at least 3 minutes, scraping the bottom and sides of the mixing container as you go.

 

2. Pour Your Resin:

Divide the resin equally among small plastic cups, allowing one cup per color.

Keep your background in mind when composing your design and choosing your colour palette: for example, if your background is white, you can get away with translucent colours whereas a dark or wood background will get best coverage from opaque colours. 

Start by pouring the white resin in one corner of your panel.




Tilt the panel to create shape.



Pour the second colour in the opposite corner:  Yolanda poured purple and Joanne poured pink.





Next, pour your third colour down in a ribbon fashion, overlapping the second colour if you wish.  Yolanda poured teal next to the purple and Joanne used rose gold next to her pink.  




Last, fill in any empty space in the middle with your metallic tint.  In our video, Yolanda poured silver while Joanne used gold.

Gently tap the panel against the work surface to help the resin self-level and to fill in any bare spots.

Torch to remove bubbles and allow the resin to sit and thicken for 15 minutes.



4. Create Your Design: 

Use a spatula to blend the colours and create some motion. Because the resin has been allowed to sit, it will retain its shape and allow more control of the movement with the spreader.



Letting the resin sit allows for the formation of cells and other cool effects. 



5. Torch, Cover And Wait: 

Torch the resin once again to remove any remaining bubbles.  Cover it with a dust cover and allow it to cure.  If tape was used, remove the tape approximately 4-6 hours later, when the resin has thickened.



How Do You Know When Your Piece Is Done?

Whether you're a seasoned professional or a brand new artist, this is something that crosses the mind of every artist at some point. Yolanda has some great advice on this topic:  you will always want to keep working on your piece but learning to let it go and walk away can be invaluable.  Keep in mind that your audience has fresh eyes and will never see the flaws that you might.  Don't overanalyze!  Instead, have confidence in your work, and most importantly, have confidence in yourself!


Take a look at the finished panels!




Have you created resin flow art?  

We'd love to hear - let us know in the comments below!

To see more of Yolanda's artwork, visit her website: 
yolandafernandesly.com

follow her on Instagram: 
@yolanda.fernandes.ly


ArtResin:  Made For Artists, By Artists.


ArtResin Epoxy Resin Passes Food Safety Tests

Posted on 21 Oct 16:51

YES it's true, cured ArtResin can be safely used as a food contact surface! This means that when used as directed, cured ArtResin will not leach any substances into food that comes into contact with it.

Don't just take our word for it, however ... 

ArtResin epoxy resin has been rigorously tested by a third party for leaching and migration across worldwide standards and regulations and PASSED every test. In other words, ArtResin is fully inert when cured.

Read on to learn more...




What Is A Migration Test?

Migration is the term used to describe the transfer of chemical substances from food contact materials into food. A migration test determines the extent of chemical transfer from a food contact material into food.  Using food simulants to approximate actual food, the test measures a material's stability and inertness by identifying both the type of substance leached and the amount. 

Following methods outlined by governing bodies from the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia and the European Union, the lab tested ArtResin against 13 different migration and food safety tests.


All 13 tests used ArtResin that was prepared according to label instructions - that is, pure ArtResin without colorants or additives, mixed in equal parts by volume, stirred for 3 minutes, torched to release bubbles and allowed to cure for 72 hrs.  



As evidenced below, ArtResin passed each and every test, determining that it is fully inert when cured. In other words, no chemical substances will migrate into food. 


These findings are important because they assure that no chemical contamination will occur when food comes into contact with cured ArtResin, making it safe to use on tableware, plates, charcuterie boards, serving trays, or anything else intended to be used for serving food.

⚠️ PLEASE NOTE: 

  • ArtResin has been deemed safe for food contact once it has cured, but please keep food or beverages well away from ArtResin in its pre-cured liquid form.
  • ArtResin is NOT edible or potable in either liquid or cured form.
  • The maximum temperature cured ArtResin can come in contact with is 120F or 50C.  Exposing ArtResin to temperatures higher than this may cause irreparable damage to the resined surface. Since hot food may exceed these temperatures, placing it on a resined surface should be avoided. 

 

If I Add A Colorant To ArtResin, Is It Still Food Safe?

Adding certain colorants may alter ArtResin's non-toxicity and non-flammability and can compromise its food safety designation. For example, adding alcohol ink to resin creates beautiful, colourful effects but since alcohol is toxic and flammable, ArtResin mixed with alcohol ink can no longer be classified as non-toxic.

The lab evaluated pure ArtResin ( i.e. without colorants or additives ) in determining it to be food safe. It should be noted that the food safe status may become compromised with the addition of foreign products into the ArtResin mixture. If you're looking for a safe option, our ResinTint liquid colorants are vegetable oil based and as such, are non-toxic. 

We are currently awaiting further test results to certify that ArtResin tinted with ResinTint is also food safe!

💡TIP:  If you're in any doubt as to whether your colorant may be safe, apply a layer of clear, non-tinted ArtResin as a final top coat to be sure. 


 

Can I Use ArtResin On Coasters and Hot Plates?


ArtResin works great for coasters, but not so great for hot plates and here’s why:
the maximum temperature that cured ArtResin can be exposed to is 120F/50C. Any temperature higher than 120F/50C, such as those from a dish straight out of the oven, may lead to some irreparable damage on your resined surface.
The heat generated from the bottom of a hot mug, on the other hand, is nowhere near that hot so you can put it on a coaster without worry.  



💡TIP: You can make coasters out of ArtResin and wood, tile, or glass mosaic, you can pour it in a silicone mold, you can even embed objects in it such as rocks, beer caps, shells etc. For more creative inspiration, check out our blog How To Make A Resin Coaster


Can I Use ArtResin On Drinkware Like Mugs, Tumblers And Glasses?


We recommend using ArtResin on the exterior of drinkware and only on drink ware intended for use with cold beverages.  We don't recommend using ArtResin to line the interior of drinkware.  This is not a safety issue ( ArtResin is inert once cured ) but rather a temperature issue. The maximum temperature ArtResin can be exposed to is 120F / 50C. A hot beverage, like a freshly brewed coffee or tea, is far hotter than 120F / 50C and the resin can become irreparably damaged if exposed to temperatures higher than this.

Best to err on the side of caution and use ArtResin on the exterior of drinkware intended for cold beverages or on an insulated tumbler.

💡TIP: For more information on how to apply ArtResin to a tumbler, see our blog How To Make A Resin Tumbler.

 

ArtResin Is Non-Toxic When Used As Directed And Is Safe For Food Contact Once Cured!

Go ahead and resin your charcuterie board, serving tray, candy dish, or cheese board with complete confidence ...


Not only is ArtResin:

  • BPA Free 
  • non-toxic when used as directed 
  • safe for home use when used in a well ventilated area  

    but now ArtResin has been deemed to be safely used as a food-contact surface. 


    ArtResin:  Made For Artists, By Artists.